Author Topic: Homemade sawdust logs?  (Read 47080 times)

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Bullony13

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Homemade sawdust logs?
« on: October 31, 2005, 02:43:42 AM »
I can get about as much free sawdust as I want. Too bad it is mostly useless to me. I have heard that those logs made out of pressed sawdust burn pretty nicely. Is it possible for me to make my own sawdust logs?


I'm thinking I could make a device similar to a log splitter. There would be a 3" steel pipe that would be a form for the log. Fill it with sawdust, and then compress it with a hydraulic cylinder of some sort.


Would that work? Think I could do it with a 20 ton hydraulic jack as the power source? Would sawdust alone hold together, or would it need some sort of glue?

« Last Edit: October 31, 2005, 02:43:42 AM by (unknown) »

crashk6

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2005, 08:36:53 PM »
Well you have the right idea... and yes I think 20 ton will do... the saw dust may hold together dependent on its mostier content. However ultimately some sort of "glue" will likely be needed, do a few test runs of just saw dust and adjust accordingly. One of the simplest binders I can think of is manure, horse or cow specifically, dried cow chips on their own burn HOT and with little smell.. add a little until it all holds together and gives a clean burn. Another thought is something with sugar like corn syrup or any other sticky plant sap. Lastly one could try waste veggie oil.


With any of these (other than maybe the oil) you would of course want to give the "log" time to cure a bit before trying to burn it.


That's it for my nickles worth.

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« Last Edit: October 30, 2005, 08:36:53 PM by crashk6 »

kell

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2005, 11:37:57 PM »
Smoke from plywood sawdust might have some unhealthy stuff in it.

IIRC, some people that collected waste sawdust from a woodshop I used to work in tended to avoid it in favor of the sawdust from solid wood.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2005, 11:37:57 PM by kell »

benjamindees

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2005, 02:50:03 AM »
However ultimately some sort of "glue" will likely be needed


Supposedly under enough pressure the lignin in the wood/grass devolves into glue and binds the pellet together.


Search for "lignin" on this page for more info: http://www.fao.org/docrep/T0275E/T0275E04.htm


I'd be interested to know how big of a pellet a 20 ton press can make.

« Last Edit: October 31, 2005, 02:50:03 AM by benjamindees »

crashk6

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2005, 04:51:09 AM »
benjamindees,

 Yes, under enough pressure the lignin will bond together, however Bullony13 is working within the limits of a 20 ton hydraulic jack and his contributing sawdust may well have varying mostier content we can't account for. He could press the dickens out of it but if the cell walls of the saw dust are dessicated or it has inconsistent moister he may end up with a pellet/log that crumbles or is hard in spots and just dust in others.


I have no doubt lignin will bond, it's pourpose was as a glue for the cellulose in the first place!... it's the primary ingredient in particle board "glue" and laminate adhesives. But in all cases they control the water content and use some additional binders to boost the rate of successfull bonding.


So as I said, adjust accordingly!


I'm interested to see the results too!

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« Last Edit: October 31, 2005, 04:51:09 AM by crashk6 »

whatsnext

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2005, 07:38:16 AM »
You might try packing the sawdust into some sort of 'form' and then just burn it as is. Using some sort of 'binder' defeats the purpose of free fuel. Pellet makers use presure and heat to get their pellets to bind. I too have an unlimited source of oak sawdust and I'm working on a pelletizer now. It will have a die that the wood dust will be extruded through. This may also work for you but I'm guessing that you are looking for log sized pellets.

John...
« Last Edit: October 31, 2005, 07:38:16 AM by whatsnext »

John II

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2005, 11:01:56 AM »
Hello: What a great idea !


I'm guessing if you compress those logs by hand, you'll generate more heat then your stove! haha. I think you'll need a motorized hydraulic system... and probably some sort of binding material. You'll probably need that saw dust ultra dry on top of it.


Also as mentioned earlier, If one had a special stove with a rotating wire basket above your flames with a auger feeding the saw dust, you might just burn the stuff directly. Bring the sawdust in through an auger tube that comes through the exhaust stack to pre-heat your sawdust to remove all moisture and have it hot before it hits the flame area.. it could burn in the rotating basket. Just a thought : )


I'm sure it can be done... and yes in our area you can have as much free hardwood saw mill (sawdust) as you want. It's a shame it's being tossed away. Burned correctly it should burn just as clean if not cleaner then any wood stove.


John II

« Last Edit: October 31, 2005, 11:01:56 AM by John II »

Vince

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2005, 04:06:38 PM »
ultimately some sort of "glue" will likely be needed


A thin mixture of paraffin would likely work.

« Last Edit: October 31, 2005, 04:06:38 PM by Vince »

Vince

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2005, 04:22:29 PM »
« Last Edit: October 31, 2005, 04:22:29 PM by Vince »

kell

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2005, 07:25:41 PM »
After reading about the sawdust stove, the obvious idea came.  Make your sawdust logs with a hole in them and burn them standing upright.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2005, 07:25:41 PM by kell »

benjamindees

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2005, 10:29:57 AM »
Using some sort of 'binder' defeats the purpose of free fuel.


Yes.  As expensive as wood is, it's still only like $60-$70/ton.  At that price, you couldn't find a cheap enough "glue" to bind together sawdust.


I was playing around this weekend with a tin can and c-clamp contraption for compressing grass.  It didn't work too well, but I'm going to try making a press from a small piece of 4" steel pipe and some threaded rod.  The plan is to fill it with grass, tighten it down, then throw it in the oven at about 300 degrees for a while.  After cooling, I'm hoping it'll be a "log".  


Actually, at this point I'm just hoping I don't destroy anything.  But a log is the eventual goal :)

« Last Edit: November 01, 2005, 10:29:57 AM by benjamindees »

nothing to lose

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2005, 07:52:09 AM »
Funny Kell mentioned an up right log woth a hole as that was sort of what I planed to post also.


 You could pack the sawdust into something like an old coffee can. Place a tube like toilet paper etc.. comes on into the center of the can and pack saw dust around that inside the can. Place can on a small stand or grate in the fireplace or woodburner in normall upright position, so hole goes up and down, not sideways. Light the center tube from the bottom. As the paper tube burns it will light the sawdust, as sawdust burns the ash falls out the bottom through the center hole. Heat, smoke, fire, etc.. comes out the top of the can. The heat you get from one of these is more dependant of how long the can is than how wide it is. Since the fire burns out the center, the longer the center the hotter the fire. So a tuna can would work but not as much heat as a coffee can or large baked bean can because of the height of the can.


I have had good luck with packing sawdust into toilet paper tubes, we now save those and paper towel tubes, wrapping paper tubes etc... They squash down flat and don't take much space to store alot of them. I was mostly making just fire starters before though, this year I plan to try some as miny logs also.

 They did seem to hold togther well enough. I just hand pressed, packed the tubes tight, laid them in as I wanted and light them. As I recall they just sat there and burned fine as long as I did not poke them. After the tube burns off if I poked or moved them they wood fall apart easily, but if left alone I think they held their shape ok.


I also used old cooking oil from the deep fryer this way. Sawdust, oil, sawdust, oil, into a coffee can mixed well, not alot of oil but enough to dampin the sawdust. I then packed that into toilet paper tubes also. Very good for starting the oak wood fires. Excess oil will soak into the cardboard tube and make it oily to, so don't make a mess or lay them on the carpet.

Sometimes I experimented with all oil/sawdust in a tube, sometimes I packed oil/sawdust on each end but dry sawdust in the center.


Try various things like that. I did so many things different ways I really forget how each one worked out exactly as far as holding shapes, heat, and other important things, but it worked well enough I will be doing it alot this year also :)


For me though, I get nearly free slab wood from a mill and I have trees that fall in the woods and other cheap/free wood available so I was using the tubes more as fire starters for heavy wood than as the primary heat source. The tubes were a way to burn off the sawdust from the wood I was cutting at the house and worked well. Places here sell sawdust to charcoal plants or as mulch generally so I might as well use slab wood myself as it is probably cheaper anyway, or sometimes I can get both free from a portable sawmill in which case the slabs are still easier and better. Though for a small fast fire just to take the chill off the house when I don't need a large long burning fire I will be using sawdust tubes this year. Slabs burn to long and over heat the house sometimes. Often we need a bit of heat from like 6PM-9PM then it seems to warm up outside again and don't need the heat rest of the night. So for that a few  small tubes work really well also. Need more heat, add more tubes.


We always seem to think round, but I would think any small cardboard box should work equally well also though. You can get them free many places in many sizes.


Of course I am thinking you want this for your own use, not selling them comercailly like wax logs are sold. Speaking of which, I used to use small chunks broke off wax logs as fire starters. $2 for a wax log (used about 3 per year) and they last along time breaking off chunks. But I now use the tubes, free, and I need to get rid of the oil, sawdust, and tubes anyway. So I save $6 on wax logs and recycle trash to heat instead :)

« Last Edit: November 03, 2005, 07:52:09 AM by nothing to lose »

crashk6

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2005, 03:03:26 PM »
The saw dust stove is certainly ideal no special preparations other than making sure the dust is extraordinarily dry... easy if you can get it directly from the dust bin. Really a bang up idea... infact as I do have a sawdust supply I may start burning it that way insted. I'll just have to see if I can make it work in my wood stove! I've tried before... my stove just isn't right for it so I just shovel a scoop at a time into the fire... but in the famous words of Lucille Ball.. "I've got an idea!"


But back on topic.. if you do make logs out of it, I'm curiouse about all this talk of using a binder "defeats the pourpose of free fuel"... especially considering the binding agents I suggested... Manure, weeds, and waste oil!


I'm serious how does that defeat the pourpose? They are all waste products including the saw dust and provided any of the binders are as conveniently available as the dust whats the problem.. because if anyone is PAYING for manure, weeds, waste oil, OR saw dust.. we need to talk about the concept of waste products! Use whatever you have handy, and good on you for it.

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« Last Edit: November 03, 2005, 03:03:26 PM by crashk6 »

whatsnext

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #13 on: November 04, 2005, 06:13:03 AM »
I try to reply to this:


"But back on topic.. if you do make logs out of it, I'm curiouse about all this talk of using a binder "defeats the pourpose of free fuel"... especially considering the binding agents I suggested... Manure, weeds, and waste oil!"


First you're operating under the assumption that "making logs out of it" is a good idea. It may not be. Secondly, many people here or anywhere, would not want to have any contact with the three items you mentioned. Waste oil is a carcinogen, dried manure comes in quantities only if you have an associated aminal operation, and weeds are everywhere but you still have to harvest them assuming they would work as a binder. Unless your time is almost worthless why would you want to spend it collecting this stuff. So, the reason it "defeats the purpose of free fuel" is because your time and health are not free. And, in the long run, it's always easier to use the fuel 'as found' then to have to go through all these machinations just to get some heat.

John.......

« Last Edit: November 04, 2005, 06:13:03 AM by whatsnext »

TECHNOHIPPY

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Making Sawdust Logs ?
« Reply #14 on: November 05, 2005, 06:08:54 PM »
Hi, Go for it.Binder is NOT necessary. Some people here in New Zealand were tinkering with this idea..Problem was the log had a weakness each time for each ram stroke and would break (At approx 1 to 1.5") into segments. Ok at home but not good commercially. Others succeeded with logs that had coal added and different machine.It is a MECHANICAL problem you have to solve..Pressure = Heat. Wood has dried  sap (Sap = Gum, Rosin When dried)that binds it togeather. Prewarming might help. 20 Tons should suffice, I cannot remember what they used..The die chamber was tapered and a continuous extrusion was the goal. I think they needed a much longer stroke so the weak spots occured in the extrusion where they needed to cut logs to size. This meant a BIG machine to be successful!
« Last Edit: November 05, 2005, 06:08:54 PM by TECHNOHIPPY »

crashk6

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #15 on: November 05, 2005, 10:22:14 PM »
Actually John, I am not operating on any assumptions of the kind, in point of

fact, if you take the time to read my post thoroughly, you will find I

happen to agree with you that using a waste product with little or no extra

processing is preferable! The concept of embodied energy is certainly valid

and something I do give some attention and consideration.


In my initial reply I was addressing the question from the original poster...

and the topic was making composite fuel from sawdust, so that's what I had

attempted to help with. I certainly can't speak for what you or anyone else

cares to dirty their hands with, those choices are up to you as an

individual. And quite frankly I didn't ask about your personal dislikes.


It is however clear to me I should have been more concise with the way I posed

my question in the message you replied to; as it seems to have invited a

somewhat closed response that had nothing to do with the context of what I was

actually asking about, so it appears, that is on me. My apologies.


To clarify, after my first post on this thread (when I made initial

suggestions), the general talk of using a binder "defeating the purpose of free

fuel" was somewhat of a puzzle, as the reason given was that you wouldn't be

able to use anything monetarily cheep enough to make it worth doing as opposed

to the cost of buying wood... buy wood? Weren't we talking freebie stuff?


I know for some people buying wood is an economical alternative to more main

stream (and dirty) fossil fuel choices, but like other here posted, I too normally get my wood fuel free of charge.


The real point to my question is... If (for whatever reason) one wants to make

a composit log/pellet how does using free sawdust and a free binder (what

ever it is) become more monetarily costly than buying fuel?

As that makes no sense to me, I thought asking was to the point... perhaps I

was mistaken.


As far as the usefulness of these particular recommendations and that they

somehow devalue your time spent collecting them and or endanger your health,

that is something I can address.


On the issue of time spent on collection, this again is all about

availability, and personal choice. If collecting seemingly sundry things

like this disagrees with you, then your not likely the kind of person who would

bother with the sawdust in the first place, let alone go to the

trouble of figuring out a method of combustion or useage.


I am not advocating going to extraordinary lengths to find these or any other

waste products... that would be silly... I'm simply saying if you have it

available... give it a shot.


Manure... well I'll be the first to say it not a bundle of roses... but it's

not without it's merits... we like to put it on the gardens rather than using

a chemical fertilizer... and my point about cow and horse dung combusting

well when dry is just a statement of fact. I have actually burnt it in my stove insted of wood. If the animals are primarily grazing then it's not to bad to work with (comparatively), pretty much just grass paste. I've even used it to give a boost to the odd batch of cob... no the wall doesn't smell.

I don't recommend using other types of animal dung for this application... as

fertilizer yes.. but for this no. As far as quantity if one does a little looking I'm sure someone can be found whom would be delighted to have you take it off there hands. I myself don't currently have horses or cows, but I have all the dung I care to.


Do you have a lawn or pasture areas? If so chances are your going to mow or

brush hog it at some point. I know waste plant material and sawdust make a

dandy log because I have done it... A good reason to compress this type of material is simply because it takes a bit less space to store and won't make such a mess on the floor in the house or shop. We made our logs with a 50/50 to 60/40 mix of sawdust and a rather sticky/sapy batch of pureed weeds that were in the bin of the field mower. As far as time spent on making them, it was minimal... sawdust and weeds got mixed up on the shed floor with rake and pitch fork, then packed into six inch diameter sections of pipe 1.5 feet in length that were standing upright in the basket of the old cider press. We had fashioned reusable "plungers" that fit into the six inch pipe, these were simply two circles of plywood with a length of iron pipe between them... they looked like really strange dumbbells/freeweights.


We just get them set into the tops of the upright pipes crank the cider press down and walk away. That setup could make ten logs at a time. The finished product was about 12-13 inches long which fit into the stove well and they usually slid right out of the "forms" but if it was stubborn a whack with the rubber mallet got them right out. We did ours throughout the spring and summer so there was ample supply come winter. Which all worked out well as the grass and weeds conveniently grow during those seasons and we couldn't seem to compost it all quick enough.


Now waste veggie oil was just a suggestion... I don't know for sure if it will help the sawdust stick together. What I do know about it is that it burns well in the right conditions... in fact around here we like to put it into diesel engines... perhaps you've heard of this practice?

As free fuel goes I find this quite worth my time to collect. As far as it being carcinogenic... well any carcinogen in waste veggie oil would only be there because it was used at high heat in a deep fryer to cook food. Which incidentally people eat that stuff... now I'm not saying fried food is all that healthy and I certainly try to avoid eating it... but I can assure you I nor likely anyone else would desire to drink used fryer oil... but as I can only speak for myself here.. I could be wrong about others drinking it, any of you want a sip?


Now everyone here is quite intelligent and I delight in seeing all the minds at work and I'm sure other freely available things can be found and even ways of burning the sawdust directly can be thought up, which of course from the stand point of embodied energy is better.

If a person is only into getting some heat and doesn't want to put any effort into it perhaps just using that little thermostat on the wall is more the speed of said individual... the respective energy company will be happy to send a bill I'm sure.


I could ask why would you want to bother collecting parts to build a

wind generator from scratch? Or install solar panels on your house? Isn't that

quite a bit of time and/or money involvement? And I would likely get a response as individual and unique as the one you just got from me.

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crashK6

« Last Edit: November 05, 2005, 10:22:14 PM by crashk6 »

whatsnext

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #16 on: November 06, 2005, 03:40:50 PM »
Wow, quite a post. I mentioned the carcinogenic qualities of 'waste oil' because you never mentioned the 'veggie' part. Plus a binder is not needed.

I'm not the sort of person who likes to do the same job over and over again. That's why I'm building my own pelletizer. I'll let it do the work instead of having to collect weeds or dung, but, to each his own.

Have fun, John.....
« Last Edit: November 06, 2005, 03:40:50 PM by whatsnext »

TimV

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #17 on: November 06, 2005, 08:11:57 PM »
I see someone has posted links to sawdust stoves.

There are several available and if you go Candian govt site for Nova scotia if you dig long enough you even find a free set of plans for one.

I saw one that was 2 55 gallon barrels mounted on top of each other end to end  feed by gravity allowing the dust to flow over a grate mounted at a 45 degree angle A simple draft door controled the burn rate and it heated a large converted commercial garage. It used about 2 wheelbarrow loads a day i was told. Do a google on sawdust furnace, pottery kilns fired by sawdust (this is a large forum) There are a lot of burners out there for this  . An outside stove with a forced air draft that will make the sawdut suspend and burn is very efficient.There is a guy in Maine that sells plans for sawdut burner . He also makes custom knives that is how I ran  across him.

Also If you want pellets from sawdust you need what is called a "pug mill" They are like a giant tapered screw that force a great mass of material out a small orfice. They are used in grain making opeations to break down soybeans for cattle feed.

The fireplace logs you buy in the store are compacted sawdust bound with wax under pressure.

There is a company in Warrensburg NY that has a sawdust furnace that burns either sawdust or wood pellets .It heats a large building.

 It is a sawdust processing company that is named Northeastern Wood Products  or may be listed under Cedar Rific Cat Litter
« Last Edit: November 06, 2005, 08:11:57 PM by TimV »

cdavid15

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #18 on: December 02, 2005, 07:01:17 PM »
I made a recent discovery for making sawdust logs just yesterday and though it is still under test, it seems to be working very well. I thought a lot about what sort of press and tube and glue to hold the sawdust together, then it came to me. Why not just press the sawdust into a burnable tube and burn the tube along with the sawdust. I tried it first with a gift paper tube and it worked like a charm. The sawdust absorbs heat from the fire, not allowing the cardboard to burn like it does when hollow. As the tube burns, it allows heat to be absorbed into the sawdust, which tends to begin fusing it together. As the outer cardboard burns off, it exposes the sawdust, which by this time has begun to burn in the layer just below the paper. My fear was that once the paper burned off, the sawdust would dump onto the fire and smother it. Didn't happen. The heat and the burn pattern of the 'log' seemed to keep it all compacted and to allow it to burn from the outside in, just like a sawdust log. You have to have a good bed of coals, though, before you put the log in.


I did it like this. First stuff one end of the tube with newspaper, packing tightly. Then begin pouring sawdust in the other end. I used a wooded dowel to pack the sawdust good and tight. If you stand the tube on the ground, it also packs the newspaper in the other end. Keep pouring and packing until the tube is full. Then stuff the other end with newspaper to keep the sawdust in.


My other concern, where do I get cardboard tubes? Carpet stores have tons of the old tubes that carpet is rolled on, which they are more than happy to give to you. So you not only use up excess sawdust, you also 'recycle' cardboard, or at least return it to nature so it doesn't end up in the landfill.


I am still in the experimental stages, so welcome any remarks by others who try this.

« Last Edit: December 02, 2005, 07:01:17 PM by cdavid15 »

ghurd

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #19 on: December 03, 2005, 04:41:55 AM »
Off topic, but fun... umm, I mean... 'Educational'.

A useless gasifier?

Carpet tube at 30~45 degrees, light the low end, smoke comes out the high end like a chimmney, light the smoke, it stays burning a few inches from the tube.

Works, somewhat, with wrapping paper tubes too.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2005, 04:41:55 AM by ghurd »
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Rowan Clearwater

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2005, 01:55:28 PM »
Aberdeen (UK)

 Hi. I'm new in here so here's my ideas.... Gather together mixed burnable waste.

Try this senario.....

Colect Woodchips from the local council, sawdust - that you have, Papermill waste (free) or waste paper and board. Waste vegetable oil.

    Run the wood chips and sawdust into a fermentor, Use waste heat from the process to warm it) and ferment for a while. Run the liquor into a still and extract METHANOL. Use the hot waste to mix all dry material into a mixed pulp. feed that between dished rollers to produce fuel pellets - the size of coal brickettes. Use the good grade waste veg oil combined with methanol as a fuel. Use the bad stuff sprayed onto the brickettes before you burn them(leave to soak in)

      What do you think?

  By combining fine sawdust and paper waste with larger chips, you get a better burn.

      You could use a system like a shot blaster to blow in air/gas and sawdust into a furnace to ensure a good clean burn.

      Think of chopped straw etc that can be mixed in. - Keep thinking of all the possibilities. Good luck
« Last Edit: December 05, 2005, 01:55:28 PM by Rowan Clearwater »

Biggmarkus

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #21 on: November 04, 2006, 03:38:19 PM »
I'm pretty sure that the commercial dura-flame firelogs use parrafin wax as a binder.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2006, 03:38:19 PM by Biggmarkus »

CeriH

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #22 on: December 17, 2006, 06:25:16 AM »
Has anybody tried a small amount of flour as a binder for sawdust logs. It is a natural product and makes an excellent glue when mixed with water.


I have not as yet tried.


Does anybody know HOW much pressure is needed to produce enough lignin from sawdust to makw it bind a pellet?


Regards

« Last Edit: December 17, 2006, 06:25:16 AM by CeriH »

purplestickmen

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #23 on: December 18, 2006, 12:15:06 AM »
Yes I tried cornflour as a binder.  It did work in sorts.  I was simply pressing the dust into a mould with a plunger.  If I was able to press with considerable force I think it would have worked well.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2006, 12:15:06 AM by purplestickmen »

purplestickmen

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #24 on: December 18, 2006, 12:21:51 AM »
I tried the tube approach.  I purchased a threaded rod from screwfix along with penny washers. I used a galvanised pipe and manufactored a wood disc made from a key hole saw that would fit inside the tube.  The thread rod ran the full lenght of the tube.  As you tighten the nut the wooden disc moves down the tube compressing the contents.  


The problem I had was yes it compressed the stuff in the tube but do you think I could get it out!  

« Last Edit: December 18, 2006, 12:21:51 AM by purplestickmen »

kennyja

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2012, 10:51:27 AM »
I have had good luck using sawdust, old bacon grease, and newspaper. Mix the sawdust and bacon grease, spread about 1/2" of mixture on a doubled up sheet of newspaper and roll it up. Add multiple sheets for a bigger log.  Works great!

OperaHouse

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Re: Homemade sawdust logs?
« Reply #26 on: October 10, 2012, 11:22:21 AM »
No, its not whats for dinner.

Made with wax and paper shreader fill.  It is a nice paper shread,  2 inch crinkled strips.  Burns slow and even.  Even starts wet wood.

I also have nade hamburgers out of dried coffee grounds and wax.