Author Topic: VAWT PHOTOS  (Read 4706 times)

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captainward

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VAWT PHOTOS
« on: December 21, 2013, 06:49:04 PM »

Here are a few photos.

captainward

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Re: VAWT PHOTOS
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2013, 09:10:16 PM »
If you are interested in how it was made:
You can view the Video on youtube  here   "my vertical axis wind turbine"  pts 1-4

hiker

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Re: VAWT PHOTOS
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2013, 10:13:30 PM »
nice---is that a treadmill motor?  whats the power out specs?
WILD in ALASKA

captainward

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Re: VAWT PHOTOS
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2013, 06:27:33 AM »
I tried the tread mill pm motor 18 amps but it took too many rpms to get any voltage, so i got another one with less rpms to get it started.  Windzilla. so I put the treadmill motor on my drill press no more changing belts yahoo.

the pma i have now is 12 amps at 300 rpms.

SparWeb

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Re: VAWT PHOTOS
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2013, 08:04:12 PM »
This is how Ed Lenz built his turbines, with an axial-flux alternator that cut in below



No one believes the theory except the one who developed it.  Everyone believes the experiment except the one who ran it.

System spec: 135w BP multicrystalline panels, regulated by Xantrex C40, DIY 8ft diameter wind turbine, regulated by Tri-Star TS60, 800AH x 24V AGM Battery, Xantrex SW4024

captainward

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Re: VAWT PHOTOS
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2014, 02:24:08 PM »
the pm dc motor i bought this time has hard cogging and just wont get up and running in my light winds.

birdhouse

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Re: VAWT PHOTOS
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2014, 03:02:51 PM »
i understand the want to have the thing spin in light winds...  just to watch it go around, even if it isn't producing power.

many times the wind required to break the cogging loose is just the right amount of wind to start producing power.  you could think of it as a bearing saver...   ;D

adam