Author Topic: Honda 2200 generator  (Read 1883 times)

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go4it

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Honda 2200 generator
« on: May 01, 2017, 01:57:52 PM »
I have a honda 2200 watt generator with  2 110v outlets. Each one has a 15 am fuse   Some of my tools don't want to run and blow the fuse. Does anyone know if perhaps these generators function as two 1100 watt generators feeding the plugs separately and if I could make up a plug to draw from both outlets feeding one electric motor.

joestue

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Re: Honda 2200 generator
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2017, 02:07:21 PM »
If it is a 120/240v generator you can reconnect the coils for 120 only. And then you can safely pull 20 amps from it.

If it's already 120v only then just change the breaker.

go4it

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Re: Honda 2200 generator
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2017, 01:15:09 PM »
It's only 120 volt and I am worried if I put in a 30 amp fuse instead of 15 amp I will set up something that causes it to let out magic smoke.

joestue

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Re: Honda 2200 generator
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2017, 01:26:03 PM »
A 20 amp circuit breaker is about right.

OperaHouse

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Re: Honda 2200 generator
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2017, 01:55:33 PM »
Don't worry about it, the engine will die first. I built a garage with a 2250W generator and it a challenge. It probably had more power than yours.

dnix71

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Re: Honda 2200 generator
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2017, 05:55:29 PM »
If yours is the inverter-based Honda 2200, then I wouldn't change anything. A lot of portable "generators" now are engines driving alternators that feed inverters.
I would ask first just how clean the output of this inverter is. Is it a true sine inverter? If it is, it probably has protection that prevents it from outputting unclean power (no voltage sags or frequency drifts).
If it is a "modified sine wave" inverter, it won't properly run many tools.

2200 watts/110v is 20 amps. But remember that circuit breakers are designed to trip at the rated amps. You can't pull more than about 80% of rated for very long. That's 16 amps. If you have a variable speed drill that shouldn't be a problem. A 7 1/4" circular saw that pulls 12 amps [unloaded and running speed] isn't going to work. You won't get it up to speed before the breakers trip.

vpdavid

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Re: Honda 2200 generator
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2017, 03:35:00 AM »
I think, you need to increase the power of your generator, or use only those tools that require less current.

george65

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Re: Honda 2200 generator
« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2017, 04:02:28 PM »

Check with your Honda dealer.
I know there is a cable you can get to daisy chain those units to give a combined output.  You _may_ be able to change the config of the outlets but just spend .20C and give a dealer a call first and find out.  If you can they will tell you and inf not you might like to buy a second unit and the cable so you do have enough power.

I'm a tight arse and always look for the cheaper alternative but those Honda generators really are fantastic little units and although a bit exy, you know you are getting your moneys worth, not just an inflated brand name pricing.

skid

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Re: Honda 2200 generator
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2017, 08:59:33 AM »
2200 watts / 120 volts = 18 amps. I'd change the breaker from 15 up to 20 amps. A lot of times high currents  are only there for a brief time such as start-up inrush current on electric motors. If you are continually running 20 amps then maybe get a bigger generator.

TheEquineFencer

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Re: Honda 2200 generator
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2017, 05:07:42 AM »
The above is a bad idea IMO. They already figured what it was capable of, do not try to make it do what it was not engineered to do. Installing a bigger breaker that is above what the wiring is rated for will not turn out good.