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Hydro / Re: 5kw Poncelet Wheel Project
« Last post by hiker on Today at 05:50:07 PM »
should make for a more even speed..not more...just my observations on my exersize bike gen..with mags mounted to the flywheel..
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Hydro / Re: 5kw Poncelet Wheel Project
« Last post by ontfarmer on Today at 04:22:10 PM »
I have been following this is there a way you can add weight a ( Flywheel ) to the wheel or the alternator?  May be better on the alternator because of more RPM.  I think that may help even the drive.
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Hydro / Re: 5kw Poncelet Wheel Project
« Last post by Mary B on Today at 03:17:57 PM »
I would think your water wheel is going to see small pulses each time a blade is first in contact with the water and as one exits. Theoretically they should cancel but slight tolerances could make the torque uneven. Measure the rpm of the wheel, if it shows a regular speed spike that is the issue I bet. It may only be slight but enough to show in the inverter output.
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Hydro / Re: 5kw Poncelet Wheel Project
« Last post by skid on Today at 11:08:27 AM »
Hi Rob,

Replacing the bearings improved the oscillation situation quite a bit. I am still getting swings, but the magnitude is much less. I don't know what normal should be however. I would think the water speed would be constant so the output should be constant.
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Wind / Re: axial generator with lamination core
« Last post by mbouwer on Today at 03:25:55 AM »
After mounting the front magnet ring.
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-  The fuel is not that common around here.   I am not much more likely to brew my own than I am to build my own EV.

Just to pint out......

You don't have to make Bio diesel. I don't . Run straight veg oil for 15 years now although I have helped a mate make 1000's of litres of bio. He stopped that about 5 years ago and it didn't really make any difference to me other than I now Collect a lot less oil as I don't need to try and help him with his supply.

As for the fuel now being common, It's in every second restaurant.  Securing a supply is usualy just a matter of approaching the restaurants to form a relationship to get the supply.
Understand you want to go electric but just clarifying a couple of points.


Quote
Voltages at Superchargers, per plug are much higher than 240 Volts (as they are at other DC quick-chargers for other vehicles).  No, I don't think the kW drop off in the way you describe when more than one Tesla is charging.

You are correct, the voltage of a supercharger is higher than 240V but the total wattage/ kw draw is what matters not the volts. I merely expressed the power in a term people would be familiar with.

As far as the superchargers backing off, That's fact from tesla themselves not something I dreamed up.  The total time to charge 2 cars plugged into a supercharger at the same time is a lot longer than if just one is.  Stands to reason.  There is not an ulimited amount of current available  especially at the rates these things are already consuming.


Superchargers may go to panels but untill that happens, they will still be grid fed and the way tesla talk and then delay, it's one of those things I'll  wait to see before I put much cred in it.  They went on about their roof tiles 6 months ago but you still can't get specs or pricing on the things. Lot of razzamatazz for nothing really.  If they don't have the product ready, launching it when they still can't give any details is nothing but a PR stunt.


Quote
- In general, in discussing the EV Industry, it is common for some journalists and industry critics to go out of their way to mix some bad information and assumptions in, when discussing the brown grid issues.  (Note, I am not referring to you, but to certain websites and such).

I think it's somewhat similar with EVs and certain websites or industry critics who are always going to ignore some of the responses and counter-balancing considerations.
.

I know the green and EV promoters do this to death.
You have probably heard of the big battery here built in only 100 Days.  Ya!  The 100 Days started about 100 Days  after the thing started being built. The 100 days was after they had enough of the thing built for the grid authorities to check and pass it for connection.  Real build time as in when they started construction to commissioning was 7 months. 

The EV thing with " No emissions" is another complete crock ignoring emission considerations from the power stations.

IF anything, I think the EV promoters are a lot more guilty of hiding the real truth and facts in order to make things look as sunshine and unicorns as they can.


Quote
  If, per capita, each vehicle passenger stops using their average number of gasoline or petro-diesel gallons per day and replaces them with 10-20 kWh per day (wild guess as to # of miles, on average being around 30-60 miles), then I think instead of making an assumption that this is not tenable in a renewably-powered world, we should look at the matter with a fresh set of eyes and ask, given the pace of change-over to renewable power, whether it will be possible.

I fail to see the connection between the  non use of liquid fossil fuels and the generation of electricity to power EV's.
Very different forms of energy and not interchangeable unless you burn that fossil fuel to make electricity at which point you are back to step 1.

Quote
I do agree that renewable fuels get short shrift from some EV advocates,

I am not an advocate of Renewable liquid fuels.  They are a crock on a large scale. There is not the space to grow sufficient to replace fossil and that's the tip of the iceberg.  From My POV, EV's are the better bet because it is possible to supply more of the energy required that way than through growing fuel.

For Nutters like me whom are an incalculable small number of the vehicle fleet to run their own vehicles on veg, it's ok,  For even 5% of the population to do it, not going to happen.


 
Quote
This isn't ideal (the vehicle has much lower noise-vibration-harshness under EV power) but is I think possible.

You have mentioned this a couple of times.
I don't know what I ic car you have driven but the IC's I drive that are even 7 years old are silky smooth and I have to look at the tacho to even know if they are running.

NVH comes mainly from the road and the way the vehicle is constructed , not the vehicle drive train.  The Engine, gearbox, diff is only a small part of the over all NVH  and not intrusive or significant in anything as modern as an EV. 
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Other / Bio mass magazine
« Last post by JW on December 13, 2017, 05:50:57 PM »
Thru out the years I have been working on biomass burners and the like

This link gives an overview of emerging technology's such as "thermo electric generators" but just for this month.
http://biomassmagazine.com
I feel this is a cutting edge technology that is currently being developed. Although I have always wanted to develop such systems, and applaud there efforts.

Most recently I demonstrated a corn kernel burner at the 2017 meet of the Steam Automobile Club of America 
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Wind / Re: axial generator with lamination core
« Last post by mbouwer on December 13, 2017, 08:16:35 AM »
Basis for the front magnet ring.
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Transportation / Re: Chevy Volt (plug-in hybrid), + solar, + garage stationary batteries
« Last post by jlsoaz on December 13, 2017, 06:24:11 AM »
Hi SparWeb - yes, I think the notion of leaving a placard or card or something is something I've found myself mulling over more, now that I've bought a PHEV.  Examples, though I'm not sure I've found quite what I want:

http://www.evchargernews.com/chargeprotocolcard.pdf
http://www.evextend.com/EVEX-VLTMAG.php
http://www.evextend.com/Products.php

In general, I think EV Etiquette is a somewhat hot-button issue among some drivers, and while there are one or two points of agreement, I would not want to come across as heavy-handed in my own views.  My own view is that I see some drivers who will tell you the principles of EV Etiquette as though they are gospel, and I just disagree with that black and white simplified view some of them seem to have.

There is one sort of obvious point of agreement, which is that most of us agree if there is a designated EV spot, we'd appreciate it if ICE drivers did not park there.  However, even with that, I think it's somewhat contextual.  For example, is the spot one of the prime spots, and used only once every few months by PEVs?  If so, can we really fully blame ICE drivers who get sick of parking further away?  My own view contrary to some others is that parking lot EV spots should not be put near handicapped and MD spots, but should be further away and  more of a compromise with ICE drivers.

Basically, what I want is that if I do plug in at a public station (it would only be L1 or L2) then a BEV driver should feel free to unplug me and plug in their own vehicle.  This just gets complicated quickly though.  For example, at some stations, there may be no other parking spot, so they would need me to show up quickly and move my car, but what if my phone is off or busy with something?  Would it really be worth all that trouble not only for me but the other driver?  Or what if there was another spot but it was occupied after I left?  Other complication examples: different PHEVs may have different issues when unplugged while charging.  My Volt was set with an alarm that would go off if unplugged without doing something (I guess to help prevent theft of the expensive chord?).  I had to learn to undo the alarm.  What if I was a BEV driver and ran across a PHEV and wanted to unplug them but didn't know if it would break something or set off an alarm? 

Perhaps more importantly, there are the complications of the human element.... you don't know if you will enrage a PHEV driver by unplugging them.  Some PHEV drivers encourage use of placards that communicate it is only ok to unplug them if the charge is finished.  I don't agree with that, but that's how they think.  Then, maybe there are BEV drivers who would get instantly upset about a PHEV using a public charge station - almost as though it is an ICE parked at an EV spot.  So, on the human side, I've seen some strong/complicating disagreement.  So, I think some PHEV drivers will avoid public charge stations altogether, while others will use them.  So far I've erred a bit too much on the side of not using them (I can think of one situation where I really should have just gone ahead). 

I think I'd have a better sense of this if I was around other EVs and public charge stations a lot, but I literally live in a county with one public L2 and only 1 other PHEV that I've actually seen, so this dog hasn't been quite as socialized as might help know all the issues. 

Hi JLsoaz,

Thank you very much for the etiquette tip!  It makes sense - a sort of pecking-order should evolve that allows the battery-dependent vehicles to step ahead of the hybrids.  There's a gas station 1 block away from the plug-in parking lot, so little reason to object when a Miev butts in ahead of a Prius, except one's pride!

I suppose one way to manage the politeness factor, and at the same time get some errands done while the car battery charges, would be to leave a card under the wiper of your car with your cell phone number.  A BEV driver that pulls up may appreciate being able to call you before unplugging your car.  This may not "scale up" to a city crowded with BEV's, but for now with just a few EV's around, the occasional call from a fellow EV driver sounds like fun!
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Transportation / Re: Chevy Volt (plug-in hybrid), + solar, + garage stationary batteries
« Last post by jlsoaz on December 13, 2017, 05:53:43 AM »
Hi George65 - I think you have some misunderstandings going on here:

In my own case:
- I'll estimate offhand that my solar is providing about 1/2 of my electricity use (including at-home PHEV charging).  Some fractional percentage should probably also be attributed to the 6 MW or so solar plant down the street in this small community.  Yes, the grid would likely be considered dirty.  Once I have enough money to install more solar panels (something I've been doing over time), the greening of my electrons (other than the tie to the semi-brown grid) will be complete.  Once I have enough money to replace my PHEV with a proper long-range BEV (about 6 years from now when a Chevy Bolt or Tesla Model 3 will come done in used prices to my price range) then my transportation will be close to zero carbon.  While I'll be giving back enough clean electrons to say I'm zero net carbon, I think strictly speaking, since I'd still be using a partially dirty utility for some things, to be fully zero carbon I'd have to go off-grid, or the utility would have to go zero carbon.

- I see EVS as similar to diesel vehicles in that the fuel source can be changed over time.  This cannot be said of gasoline vehicles other than maybe high percentage ethanol flex-fuel vehicles. 

- I have attended local biofuel meetings a long time ago, but in my own case, it would be difficult for me to run veggie diesel.  The fuel is not that common around here.   I am not much more likely to brew my own than I am to build my own EV.  On the other hand, I'd be happy to consider buying a biodiesel PHEV.  I should note also, even 13 years ago, used diesels were not that common around here, and as for keeping a new vehicle under warranty, I was not willing to pay the depreciation on a new vehicle, much less spend my time winding my way through any warranty considerations.

In general:
- The high kW Tesla public charging you've heard about takes place at DC quick charge "supercharger" stations built by Tesla.

(Just in case this is of use, although you may have already seen this, you can see a map of them and other charge stations here, using the filters):
https://www.plugshare.com

Voltages at Superchargers, per plug are much higher than 240 Volts (as they are at other DC quick-chargers for other vehicles).  No, I don't think the kW drop off in the way you describe when more than one Tesla is charging.  I have lost track of exactly what Tesla has said on the matter, but they have demonstrated and I think discussed from the start a  commitment to making the stations renewably powered and have gone pretty far out of their way as a company to incorporate (literally) solar into what they do.

There is some recent information here as to Tesla's Superchargers and renewability:
http://www.thedrive.com/sheetmetal/11338/tesla-going-off-the-grid-plans-to-power-superchargers-using-solar
Tesla Going Off the Grid, Plans to Power Superchargers Using Solar
More infrastructure upgrades announced to solidify Tesla's footing in the marketplace.
BY ROB STUMPFJUNE 9, 2017

When Teslas charge at 240 Volts AC, I think this is more in the range of 5 or 10 or 20 kW (such as at homes, or such as you'll see at some hotels and such, on the map).

- In general, in discussing the EV Industry, it is common for some journalists and industry critics to go out of their way to mix some bad information and assumptions in, when discussing the brown grid issues.  (Note, I am not referring to you, but to certain websites and such).

I haven't studied it as much recently, but I am going to estimate this is somewhat similar to some of the over-simplified carbon criticisms that are leveled sometimes at renewable fuels such as whether it is improper to use food for fuel, whether fossil-fuel-based pesticides were used in the farming, whether petroleum was used in the farming or transportation of the fuel, whether the localized air emissions are healthy (NOx), whether renewable fuels really can be scaled, etc.  There are I think some nuanced, useful and balanced answers (such as that some renewable fuels on balance are much lower carbon than others, and that ultimately synthesis of renewable fuels will likely be possible at much higher volumes than today), but there are times when it is apparent there is going to be someone who from the start of the conversation is really just out to look only at the problems and not the solutions. 

I think it's somewhat similar with EVs and certain websites or industry critics who are always going to ignore some of the responses and counter-balancing considerations.

- From the start of EV deployment, there's been a decent correlation of demographics of EV early adopters and PV early adopters.  I reckon over time the percentages may fall off somewhat.

- On the big question of whether we should be fearful that massive amounts of brown grid power are needed to power high-volume deployment of EVs, I do agree it is a concern (just as there would be some major concerns to try to project a planet with a 90 or 100m bbl per day petroleum habit transitioning to veggie diesel.)  However, I have heard conflicting points as to whether it really ends up being quite as much a concern as you describe.  If, per capita, each vehicle passenger stops using their average number of gasoline or petro-diesel gallons per day and replaces them with 10-20 kWh per day (wild guess as to # of miles, on average being around 30-60 miles), then I think instead of making an assumption that this is not tenable in a renewably-powered world, we should look at the matter with a fresh set of eyes and ask, given the pace of change-over to renewable power, whether it will be possible.

I do agree that renewable fuels get short shrift from some EV advocates, and there are times when I may sort of be one of those people, but at other times I think I've kept some perspective on renewable fuels.  For example, I have noted in another forum that one of the major failings of the Volt I bought is that it does not allow me to fill the gasoline tank with reneweable or partially-renewable fuel of some sort.  I'm not sure how reliable the information is, but one reason I've been offered why this is so is that it would be difficult to design the vehicle such that the fuel side could sit for weeks or months unused (as happens with some drivers who stay within the EV range for weeks or months at a time and don't use gasoline from the tank).  I think this particular objection could be solved by programming the vehicle to burn some fuel on occasion even if the driver didn't want.  This isn't ideal (the vehicle has much lower noise-vibration-harshness under EV power) but is I think possible.

Anyway, some thoughts.

opinions my own / speaking only for myself.

I do realize that some rural livers don't care about low CO2, or maybe even other pollutants, but I do. 

While your intentions are noble, I have to question their effectiveness.
A quick look up of arizona power supply shows it to be 10% renewable at best. The rest is Coal, Gas and Nuke generated in the majority.
With only a 2.7 Kw solar supply of your own, I'd suggest for the most part you are merely substituting one Fossil fuel source for another. I'd further tend to think if a primary goal was emissions, you'd be far better off with a Diesel Vehicle and running it on 100% renewable Veg oil.

You would have the advantage of a far greater range ( I carry extra Fuel in my 4WD and do a 2500KM trip once-twice a year using nothing but veg) Cost savings and be able to use the power you make from your solar in your home.
If you are electric dedicated, then Putting a LOT more panels on your roof would be very worthwhile.  You would generate probably 10-15 Kwh a day with what you have now and I can't see that going far in an electric vehicle.
Another option may be to charge the thing with a veg fuelled generator.

All this electric car thing is good and well but people really tick me off when they start talking about zero emissions. NO, there is noting coming out your tail pipe but the one a few hundred miles away has a 30 Ft round tail pipe and that where the emissions your Vehicle makes are emitted from. Either that or it's put into strongly sealed containers. and buried under mountains for future generations to try to figure out what the hell to do with it.

Electrics now have speed, range and fast charging.... for the time being.
There are not too many places in the world where the grid would be able to take Twice let alone maybe 50 times the load transfering all the IC Vehicles to electrics would impose.  This is the real problem with electrics.

Sure, Tesla is making ( broken) promises of how many model 3's they are going to be able to produce by the end of 2018 but I wonder how fast the grid is going to be able to keep up with them?  The thing of charging stations will be an issue as well.  If you compare how many vehicles a service station can refuel in an hour and how many cars can get through a charging station, there is a real problem there on several levels.
In busy times where there is a lot of traffic, It's hard to see how they are going to have enough space an charging stations to cater for the amount of people that want to recharge.

Sure, put a charging station in every parking bay at maccas so people can go in , grab a bit and a coffee and have a break while their car charges up.
I think I looked up before a tesla can suck down 120Kw at a charging station.  On 240V that's nearly 500A. A normal house connection here is 80A and it would be extremely rare to find a single place sucking down that much power.
Let say there are 20 Charging stations in the carpark, that's 2.4 Mw of power just at that site . How many other sites will that segment of the grid be feeding and further back, how many will be in the area supplied but the local sub and power stations?

Another thing that's not mentioned with charging time with teslas is they quote an hour. That's true if the thing isn't completely flat which we'll assume it is not and people leave a small reserve as one normally would with a petrol car.  You go to the supercharger and plug in next to the guy that just pulled up. The charger is current limited and you are only going to get 30Kw being the second car to plug in rather than the 120Kw which is the max charge rate. Because the guy beside was before you but still needs to do a full charge more or less, your recharge could take 2 hours not 1.  And that is if it's getting full power in the first place and the site isn't limited on it's max current draw because of all the other stations and the wiring at the power pole.

Thanks to the rush to remove Coal fired power stations and go renewable, we are facing severe power shortages here. It's not going to be a quick fix and I can easily see limits being put on EV's should they start becoming popular so as to stop Taking power away from homes, Businesses and places like hospitals, schools etc.

The problem now is not with EV's but will be how to in fact Fuel them.
Seems like the same old problem to me.
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