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Hi JLsoaz,

Thank you very much for the etiquette tip!  It makes sense - a sort of pecking-order should evolve that allows the battery-dependent vehicles to step ahead of the hybrids.  There's a gas station 1 block away from the plug-in parking lot, so little reason to object when a Miev butts in ahead of a Prius, except one's pride!

I suppose one way to manage the politeness factor, and at the same time get some errands done while the car battery charges, would be to leave a card under the wiper of your car with your cell phone number.  A BEV driver that pulls up may appreciate being able to call you before unplugging your car.  This may not "scale up" to a city crowded with BEV's, but for now with just a few EV's around, the occasional call from a fellow EV driver sounds like fun!
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Transportation / Re: Chevy Volt (plug-in hybrid), + solar, + garage stationary batteries
« Last post by jlsoaz on December 12, 2017, 05:32:12 PM »
Thankfully, the subject of this thread is just about One person's experience with One EV and not about the electrical grid of the state of Arizona, the USA, or the world.  Since the OP's got their own system set up professionally at home now, it's not their problem who else in the world needs to convert over later.  Any trend in that direction, BTW, will most likely fix the limitation that Jlsoaz has with charging stations, by making a demand for more of them.

NB. There is a J1772 charging station between my house and work, now.  I'm one step closer to making the change, myself  :)

Hi - one issue that I sort of anticipated (I guess) but which in its way feels somewhat unanticipated - when I had a short-range BEV, the location of J1772s was critical.  With a PHEV it is all-but-irrelevant.  Further (and I guess I sort of knew this) there is an issue with parking my PHEV and charging at a Level 2 since, if a BEV pulls up and needs it, and there are no others around, then they will be unhappy, may get up on their high horse, etc.  I'm ok if they unplug me, but could do without the moralizing and etiquette debates so I largely avoid this. 

I worked with a local business person years ago to put in the only public J1772 in this small county, and that helped me get home with my short-range BEV and so I'm quite familiar with when charging is a need and not a want.  I think the issues are somewhat different for rural J1772 and DC quick charge spaced far apart, and for urban areas where folks may have more choice?  I don't know.  The urban folks also have to contend with a lot more crowding in terms of the on-the-road EV population.  To my knowledge, I'll guess there are less than a dozen EV owners in the county.  That one J1772 that is put in around here is the only proper J1772 "watering hole" for one's horse for dozens of miles, so I do use it for my PHEV, but gingerly (such as sticking around to move my car in case a BEV pulls up). 

When I used to try to lobby some other local businesses to put one in, I sometimes felt like I was in the 19th century trying to sell saloon or b&b owners on the idea of putting in a horse watering trough.

addendum/ps: this may already be clear, but to note or re-note for a moment: there is a shift when you get a BEV or PHEV, involving getting used to charging at home at night (for most folks).  So, yes, for some purposes, public charge stations are critical, but it bears mentioning that for many BEV drivers, and as well I think for many (nearly all?) PHEV drivers, a high percentage of charging takes place at home and, if a driver works for a place that is amenable, then at work as well.
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Transportation / Re: Chevy Volt (plug-in hybrid), + solar, + garage stationary batteries
« Last post by jlsoaz on December 12, 2017, 08:58:10 AM »
Thank you very much for the report about the Volt.  I am gradually approaching the need to replace my daily-driver car and I expect to look seriously at PHEV's on the next go-round.  I live in the country, making pure-battery vehicles unlikely to suit my needs, especially in the winter, and especially considering the possibility of collisions at highway speed.  Now that the field of HEV's has diversified and offers Plug-ins (in Canada, not all models are offered as in the USA), I have some serious contenders to choose from.

Hey, yes, your considerations seem somewhat similar to mine, but not the same of course (bit of a contrast between sort-of-rural Arizona and rural Canada).  I like your thinking.... if a BEV is not right for you at this time, then go for a PHEV.  A counter-point for me has been that the slowness of proliferation of new PHEV choices into the marketplace (at least two of the best sellers in Europe are still not here) meant that for me when I went to buy a used PHEV at my price point, there were very few choices.  I don't know if you will find what you want (new or used) when you go to look at PHEVs, but if buying new, I do think there is a wider array of choices on the market or arriving soon.

Speaking only for myself/opinions my own.
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Transportation / Re: Chevy Volt (plug-in hybrid), + solar, + garage stationary batteries
« Last post by jlsoaz on December 12, 2017, 08:52:37 AM »
are you using the EV to somehow power your house? I am ASE Advanced level Specialist and the voltages are out of reach to do something like that. If Im missing something let me know.

Thanks, I am not trying to power my house with the PHEV.  It is just for driving.  I do separately have 12 kWh of deep cycle lead acid batteries and a smart inverter to manage decisions as to whether to draw from grid power, solar power, battery power, or where to put the energy when not needed.  The batteries are 4x12 Volts = 48 Volts (the installer told me on this particular system that was important).  They are high amp-hour and seem to be still going ok after a few years in my garage.
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Hi - there seems to be something awry for me with the notification of replies function, so I didn't realize some of these helpful comments are here.  I wasn't familiar with the term shadecloth, but looking here:

http://www.shadeclothstore.com/default.aspx

I would characterize the material I have been using as a (seemingly) particularly effective shadecloth that accomplishes (better than one other "shadecloth" I've tried) the dual task of allowing a lot of natural light in, but keeping the worst of the heating aspect out.  However, since I've only tried one other material, I don't really know with certainty if the main material I like

http://solarthermalfabrics.com

is better than the other ones at the shadecloth store.

My main use here, for more than a decade, is on the roof, on a 4 foot by 4 foot glass overhead skylight in a partially-underground hobbit type house.  If I didn't have something on the outside against the Arizona sun, then in summer the room would be unbearable .... perhaps even to the point where any equipment in the room over time might be subject to damage.  If I just draw the blind on the interior of the skylight (I do have a blind there) then the room becomes dark and dreary (and may be trapping the heat in a way that is not smart).  With this particular outside material that I mentioned, the room once again becomes arguably the best room in the house, since it welcomes the light, but repels those aspects of the sunlight which cause the worst of the heat.  I wonder if, in the shadecloth business, there is a particular numerical measure of this combination, and one could compare.

I haven't had that much communication with others about their solutions, and am not very handy, so I am not that knowledgeable about solutions that may be obvious to others.  This particular use of the material in a sense seems to my limited knowledge to be in a situation where not just any shadecloth will do, as the direct overheard sun provides a real test, but when you're partially underground, you don't want to give away that valuable visible sunlight which helps make living in the house to be enjoyable.
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Wind / Re: Kragten Design no longer a commercial company
« Last post by Adriaan Kragten on December 12, 2017, 01:50:01 AM »
The link which JW placed to the list with KD-reports is no longer working because I have changed the list. The new list is on top of the menu KD-reports on my website www.kdwindturbines.nl. The second file, which is the folder "Sequence of KD-reports for self-study", has been changed too.
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Thankfully, the subject of this thread is just about One person's experience with One EV and not about the electrical grid of the state of Arizona, the USA, or the world.  Since the OP's got their own system set up professionally at home now, it's not their problem who else in the world needs to convert over later.  Any trend in that direction, BTW, will most likely fix the limitation that Jlsoaz has with charging stations, by making a demand for more of them.

NB. There is a J1772 charging station between my house and work, now.  I'm one step closer to making the change, myself  :)
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Hydro / Re: 5kw Poncelet Wheel Project
« Last post by skid on December 11, 2017, 08:25:11 PM »
Very interesting and useful Clockman! I was just going through a blade profile analysis with my CAD buddy based on several different immersion depths and we came to a similar conclusion and blade profile. Interesting on how they triangulated the spokes as well.

Thanks!
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Wind / Re: Once again in 3-part (phase) harmony
« Last post by MattM on December 11, 2017, 06:32:17 PM »
I remember the location of guy wires playing a big role in vibration.

SparWeb's suggestions would help diagnose the source of you could record wind speed, too.  Each rotation of the turbine disrupts airflow each time the blade passes in front of the mast.  An out of balance turbine would have a similar frequency, but a different trough pattern. Sound forms might suggest something altogether out of sync with the turbine. Knowing the frequency would pinpoint more specifically the type of vibration.  It could be something as simple as a broken  allowing tangential rotation of an isolated segment of the tower.
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I do realize that some rural livers don't care about low CO2, or maybe even other pollutants, but I do. 

While your intentions are noble, I have to question their effectiveness.
A quick look up of arizona power supply shows it to be 10% renewable at best. The rest is Coal, Gas and Nuke generated in the majority.
With only a 2.7 Kw solar supply of your own, I'd suggest for the most part you are merely substituting one Fossil fuel source for another. I'd further tend to think if a primary goal was emissions, you'd be far better off with a Diesel Vehicle and running it on 100% renewable Veg oil.

You would have the advantage of a far greater range ( I carry extra Fuel in my 4WD and do a 2500KM trip once-twice a year using nothing but veg) Cost savings and be able to use the power you make from your solar in your home.
If you are electric dedicated, then Putting a LOT more panels on your roof would be very worthwhile.  You would generate probably 10-15 Kwh a day with what you have now and I can't see that going far in an electric vehicle.
Another option may be to charge the thing with a veg fuelled generator.

All this electric car thing is good and well but people really tick me off when they start talking about zero emissions. NO, there is noting coming out your tail pipe but the one a few hundred miles away has a 30 Ft round tail pipe and that where the emissions your Vehicle makes are emitted from. Either that or it's put into strongly sealed containers. and buried under mountains for future generations to try to figure out what the hell to do with it.

Electrics now have speed, range and fast charging.... for the time being.
There are not too many places in the world where the grid would be able to take Twice let alone maybe 50 times the load transfering all the IC Vehicles to electrics would impose.  This is the real problem with electrics.

Sure, Tesla is making ( broken) promises of how many model 3's they are going to be able to produce by the end of 2018 but I wonder how fast the grid is going to be able to keep up with them?  The thing of charging stations will be an issue as well.  If you compare how many vehicles a service station can refuel in an hour and how many cars can get through a charging station, there is a real problem there on several levels.
In busy times where there is a lot of traffic, It's hard to see how they are going to have enough space an charging stations to cater for the amount of people that want to recharge.

Sure, put a charging station in every parking bay at maccas so people can go in , grab a bit and a coffee and have a break while their car charges up.
I think I looked up before a tesla can suck down 120Kw at a charging station.  On 240V that's nearly 500A. A normal house connection here is 80A and it would be extremely rare to find a single place sucking down that much power.
Let say there are 20 Charging stations in the carpark, that's 2.4 Mw of power just at that site . How many other sites will that segment of the grid be feeding and further back, how many will be in the area supplied but the local sub and power stations?

Another thing that's not mentioned with charging time with teslas is they quote an hour. That's true if the thing isn't completely flat which we'll assume it is not and people leave a small reserve as one normally would with a petrol car.  You go to the supercharger and plug in next to the guy that just pulled up. The charger is current limited and you are only going to get 30Kw being the second car to plug in rather than the 120Kw which is the max charge rate. Because the guy beside was before you but still needs to do a full charge more or less, your recharge could take 2 hours not 1.  And that is if it's getting full power in the first place and the site isn't limited on it's max current draw because of all the other stations and the wiring at the power pole.

Thanks to the rush to remove Coal fired power stations and go renewable, we are facing severe power shortages here. It's not going to be a quick fix and I can easily see limits being put on EV's should they start becoming popular so as to stop Taking power away from homes, Businesses and places like hospitals, schools etc.

The problem now is not with EV's but will be how to in fact Fuel them.
Seems like the same old problem to me.


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