Author Topic: chest type fridge /humidity control  (Read 6659 times)

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xboxman

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chest type fridge /humidity control
« on: April 21, 2012, 09:29:47 AM »
hi

with a chest type fridge  how much of a problem is the humidity ?? does it build up a lot and whats the best ways to deal with it ??

thanks

vtpeaknik

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Re: chest type fridge /humidity control
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2012, 11:32:14 AM »
It probably depends on the type of fridge or freezer.  I converted a standard (Sears Kenmore) 9cf chest freezer to an energy-efficient refrigerator by adding an "external" thermostat that was supposedly designed for homebrewing.  The long probe of the thermostat is inside the freezer and the control unit is in a box on the wall along with a split 2-outlet AC socket: if I plug the freezer into one outlet it runs as a freezer, in the other it runs as a refrigerator at about 35-40F.  In the latter mode, with ambient temperature about 60 (in the basement), my Kill-a-Watt meter says it uses about 7 watts average.

But there are issues: This chest freezer has the cooling elements built into the inside walls and, when it is running, those wall get below freezing.  Thus I have to keep sensitive items (veggies) a bit away from the walls.  And, I get condensation on those walls, especially in the summer (more humid), despite the limited air exchange with the basement due to the chest style.  After some time it collects quite a puddle on the bottom, and it started rusting.  Thus I need to keep the contents off the floor of the unit, and sponge out the water every month or so.  This is definitely not what it was designed to do, although with care it is still useful.  With a minimal PV system it was all the frig I could run in case of a grid outage (along with a chest freezer and some lights).

xboxman

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Re: chest type fridge /humidity control
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2012, 12:40:22 PM »
7  watts is great
i wonder what if we use 1 or 2 Hydrosorbent Silica Gel Dehumidifier 200 Gram Reuseable link below says it will protect up to 15 cubic feet of enclosed space( i know the door would be opened a lot ) but still should help and put it out in the sun when it needs to be reactivated
http://www.amazon.com/Hydrosorbent-Silica-Dehumidifier-Gram-Reuseable/dp/B000N5QECU

OperaHouse

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Re: chest type fridge /humidity control
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2012, 01:24:51 PM »
Mine gets used quite a bit and collects lots of moisture.  These usually have a drain.  Mine is connected to a hose thatgoes through the floor.  Make sure it has some trap.  And it will need to be cleaned.

dnix71

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Re: chest type fridge /humidity control
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2012, 08:24:37 PM »
I have a 12v Engel upright igloo style fridge. There is no drain in it, either. I have to empty it of food occasionally and use a clean bath towel to sop up the water that collects at the bottom. A bigger issue is it's poor insulation of the lid. I keep bath towels folded up on top. They insulate the top but the lid usually has a wet spot on one side. The fridge runs quite a bit less in the summer with the towels on top for insulation.

There is an insulated travel bag but it costs lots of money extra.

thirteen

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Re: chest type fridge /humidity control
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2012, 10:23:45 PM »
If it is feasible you could glue some styrofoam pieces to the side and top and make them look ok maybe install a small vent at the top just on the lid to maybe vent it some moisture. As mentioned install a small drain that could maybe be opened ever so often. just an idea
MntMnROY 13

ghurd

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Re: chest type fridge /humidity control
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2012, 05:28:18 PM »
glue some styrofoam pieces to the side and top

Careful!
Many or most use the sides to get rid of the heat from inside.
Insulating the sides can be a very bad idea.
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thirteen

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Re: chest type fridge /humidity control
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2012, 07:43:41 AM »
Thanks for the information. I am going to get my heat gun and follow the heat disbursement on the sides of my neighbors freezer. I did not realize that they designed freezers for the heat loss from the sides. I've just considered the fins and vents behind and where the compressors worked as adequate. From a chest freezer to use as a fridge I wonder how much heat loss is needed.
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hydrosun

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Re: chest type fridge /humidity control
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2012, 10:12:49 AM »
There are some chest freezers that use external fins to disapate the heat from the freon. I found onde by magic chef that has the external coils. so I was able to add 2 inches of foam insulation glued to the outside. I'm running it as a freezer and the small (6 cubic feet) only uss 250 watt hours a day. The top piece of foam isn't glued and sealed to the lid so it condences water onto th etop of the lid under the foam. And it sometimes freezes the lid close and i have to use a bar to break it open. i clean it up and it's back in business.
Chris

thirteen

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Re: chest type fridge /humidity control
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2012, 11:22:36 AM »
As a suggestion we had a freezer door that kept freezing shut so we cleaned the edge where it sealed and put some cooking oil an a towel and wiped it where the seal fit and it did not stick. Just an idea to play or toss. I've made a seal by putting oil on one side of a door frame and put silicone on the other part of the door or side piece. Pushed them together but not real tight. Let it dry over night and then pushed the door closed tightly making a good flexible seal. This will make a good seal. Worth the try.
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wpowokal

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Re: chest type fridge /humidity control
« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2012, 06:48:08 PM »
The build up of ice in your chest freezer is a direct result of opening the lid, don't open it and you will never get an ice build up, but of course that defeats the purpose of owning one.

How much of a problem depends on the humidity at the time that you open the lid, schedule lid openings to times of low humidity, or be like the rest of us and live with the necessity of defrosting it occasional. 

Defrosting the chest freezer is a pain but the energy efficiency makes it acceptable, for me anyway.

I live in the tropics and originally the large chest freezer (large because there are time when we are cut off for extended periods and I like my food) lived on the veranda, now humidity is 99% most of the time so ice build up was a problem. I moved it inside, and due to the inside being air conditioned and most of the time being around 60% humidity freezer ice is not a problem anymore. 

Allan
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