Author Topic: Some simple math on a Toyota Yaris  (Read 14018 times)

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Frank S

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Re: Some simple math on a Toyota Yaris
« Reply #27 on: July 09, 2012, 02:00:45 AM »


I recently have started 'doing the math' to figure out what vehicle is going to be cheapest to drive. I drive ~30k miles a year.

Candidates that look promising are the Toyota Corolla and Camry, Mazda 3 with 'Skyactive' engine, Volkswagen with TDI, KIA Optima and a few more. I'll pay more for a VW TDI because I am a diesel fan. Mazda MAY be importing a diesel next year.

Cost will include purchase, fuel, oil changes, tires, major services and such. As I tend to drive things over 300,000 miles, 'trade in' recovery of investment is not considered.

Ron

 Ron last year while in Spain I drove the VW polo diesel a little over 6000 miles during my vacation
 overall average was between 35 & 40 MPG this war a well mixed city & beach type driving Mountains and some freeway I 6 ft tall and I didn't find uncomfortable even driving 6 or 8 hours at a time. unlike my 2007 trailblazer that just kills me to have to drive it more than 30 or 40 miles
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keithturtle

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Re: Some simple math on a Toyota Yaris
« Reply #28 on: July 09, 2012, 08:22:06 PM »
I'll give you the low down on the TDI- 8 months ago I bought the new Passat with TDI- dsg "automatic" and I am quite pleased with the performance.

While accelleration isn't breath-taking, it will hold its own on highway ramps and passing, up to 85mph.

I've been a Chevy man for years, but that Cruze was the closest thing to what I wanted, and I'm tired of shifting.  They only build the turbo-diesel overseas.  And it's really a Daewoo, korean.

At least the VW is built in Chattanooga, USA.  German heritage and quality, nothing like it made here [that I can afford].

For a 3400 lb car it does well on fuel, 43 combined city, highway and it ain't even broken in yet.  I don't push it too hard, may be why the good economy, IDK.

The SE was kinda pricey, but I've cut my fuel bill to a third of what it was driving the silverado.

IMHO, you cant go wrong with the TDI.  The smaller cars [Jetta, Golf] get even better mileage.  I hear reports of 52 mpg in a standard Golf TDI.

I'm still not sold on hybrids, too much to go wrong.  I've had 3 older MB diesels, so I am familiar with the old tech as well.  There ain't no comparison to this TDI.  I like it.  If all the electronic stuff keeps working, I'll really be pleased as I drive it to 300k or beyond

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Frank S

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Re: Some simple math on a Toyota Yaris
« Reply #29 on: July 10, 2012, 01:56:58 AM »
I'll give you the low down on the TDI- 8 months ago I bought the new Passat with TDI- dsg "automatic" and I am quite pleased with the performance.

While accelleration isn't breath-taking, it will hold its own on highway ramps and passing, up to 85mph.

I've been a Chevy man for years, but that Cruze was the closest thing to what I wanted, and I'm tired of shifting.  They only build the turbo-diesel overseas.  And it's really a Daewoo, korean.

At least the VW is built in Chattanooga, USA.  German heritage and quality, nothing like it made here [that I can afford].


 About the only thing I liked coming from GM  in recent years was the 89 2500 suburban 454with tow package
 But the company I'm with decided to replace its fleet of  Toyota Prados & Mitsubishi Montenegros for the managers & engineers with the trailblazers in 07 my Mitsubushi had 400K on it with no major repairs only things like brakes tires the normal wear & tear items
 The trailblazers a fleet of 10 have an average of 160k so far there has been 25 transmission rebuilds 1 engine 18 computer replacements all of the front wheel drive CV shafts have been discarded except on mine, the one I drive only has 120K but is on its 3rd transmission and the 4x4 feature has never worked very well since new.
 Its pretty bad when the fleet of 20 2005 Chinese 4 door pickups have a lower total repair bill for 7 years than the 5 years of chevys and much of the repairs on the fleet of what I call junk pickups is from accidents.
 If I were involved in purchasing I would buy the VW Amarok TDI 4 door 4x4 with automatics for the engineers  when it comes time for replacing the trailblazers
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zap

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Re: Some simple math on a Toyota Yaris
« Reply #30 on: July 10, 2012, 09:46:47 AM »
Ron last year while in Spain I drove the VW polo diesel...
It's been rumored for years that the Polo would come to the states.  The latest that I know of was from VW themselves saying Spring of 2012... I'm pretty sure Spring is well past sprung ::)

At least the VW is built in Chattanooga, USA.  German heritage and quality, nothing like it made here [that I can afford]...

The SE was kinda pricey, but I've cut my fuel bill to a third of what it was driving the silverado.
I wanted a diesel Rabbit from the first time I read about them in the late 70's.  I talked about it so much that my Dad decided to buy one in '78?
I finally saved enough to get one in '80( ??? )  Mine was the first year they made them in the states and was a total lemon with problem after problem from the very first week.
My Dad's was German made and he never had a single problem with his.  He put on a turbo after about 2 years and ended up selling it 12 or 13 years later with 275,000 miles on it and it still ran like a top.

The mpg average on my Silverado for the last year and a half is 21.7 at darn near 50/50 city/highway.

Getting what I'm sure is horrible mpg in San Fran... but it does look like fun!

ghurd

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Re: Some simple math on a Toyota Yaris
« Reply #31 on: July 10, 2012, 11:16:49 PM »
I was surprised too with how much space is in a Prius, especially legroom in the front and back.  I wish people would calculate the payoff period for their fuel savings over 100k miles or the life of the car instead of 3-5 years... plus, the prius will hold it's value well for when you decide to sell it.

I've been playing with my driving style while driving to work ...

Correct, the Prius is NOT small.
My friend has a Honda Accord(?), the bigger type whatever it is.  It looks bigger than the Prius, but back seat leg room is a bit wanting for me, and head room is not enough (sitting up straight, my head can touch!).  I'm 5'-10".
Plenty of room in the back too.

I don't think its fair to compare a Prius to a Yaris or Geo Metro or Golf or that new goofy little Fiat.
They are not in the same class.
Point taken on the MPG, but comparing a Caddy to a Yaris To a Suburban will depend on who wants it for what.

I am getting a hair under 60MPG lately, but like I said, the way I usually have to drive it is not condusive to the MPG it is capable of getting.  One better day, it was up closer to 70MPG.

"I've been playing with my driving style "
Me too.  Go figure!
There is this one long fairly steep hill (by local standards) that I go up ~5 times a day.
Trying to get the best MPG, going up slow and easy, easy acceleration, stays bouncing around 11~13MPG.
Was in a big hurry a few times. Hard accelleration, nothing slow and easy about it, and it dropped down to maybe 7~8MPG for a couple seconds, then up to about 18~21MPG the whole rest of the way.

Another long steep hill I travel a few times a day.
If traffic is slower than 35~40MPH, it gets 20~25MPG going up.
If traffic is faster or not in my way, at 45MPH it gets 28~32 going up.

Not at all what I expected.
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taylorp035

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Re: Some simple math on a Toyota Yaris
« Reply #32 on: July 11, 2012, 10:32:13 AM »
Quote
Another long steep hill I travel a few times a day.
If traffic is slower than 35~40MPH, it gets 20~25MPG going up.
If traffic is faster or not in my way, at 45MPH it gets 28~32 going up.

Not at all what I expected.

It's all about the BSFC graph and your gearing.  In the BMW, I can get 30 mpg at 68 on a flat road, but 41 mpg @ 40 mph or 35 mpg at 75 mph (all in 5th gear).

Quote
here is this one long fairly steep hill (by local standards) that I go up ~5 times a day.
Trying to get the best MPG, going up slow and easy, easy acceleration, stays bouncing around 11~13MPG.
Was in a big hurry a few times. Hard accelleration, nothing slow and easy about it, and it dropped down to maybe 7~8MPG for a couple seconds, then up to about 18~21MPG the whole rest of the way.

The cool part is that MPG doesn't depend on speed, so basically it's a game of how high can you make the mpg readout go while keeping a constant speed.  I have a steep hill that I play with too... I can only manage to make it read 7 or 8 mpg.  I found 30 mph was better than 25 mph in the Jeep.


ghurd

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Re: Some simple math on a Toyota Yaris
« Reply #33 on: September 09, 2012, 09:22:13 AM »
Quote
Another long steep hill I travel a few times a day.
If traffic is slower than 35~40MPH, it gets 20~25MPG going up.
If traffic is faster or not in my way, at 45MPH it gets 28~32 going up.

Not at all what I expected.

It's all about the BSFC graph and your gearing.  In the BMW, I can get 30 mpg at 68 on a flat road, but 41 mpg @ 40 mph or 35 mpg at 75 mph (all in 5th gear).

Its a Prius!
There is no "gearing".
There is not even a gear shift really.  It's probably best discribed as a joystick with "frontwards" and "backwards".

Flat road at 40MPH and the gas motor RPM?  The gas motor may be running at a mid range RPM, or low RPM, or idling, or not even running at all.
The state of the gas motor would depend on the temp of the motor (it will idle to keep the temp at normal), and the state of the big battery.
If the motor is warm and the big battery is in the green, the gas motor shuts down.
The power steering and brakes are electric, so is the A/C, but the heat is from the coolant, so the computer thinks about everything, and decides when the gas motor should be running, and what RPM it will be.
The gas pedal isn't even connected to the motor!

It really is like driving a computer game.
I got the 'feel' of it pretty well now.  Not uncommon for me to do 2 miles of city driving without the gas motor even starting.  Longest so far is maybe 3.5 miles or a bit more.  Naturally that is mostly down hill, but still!
Between the battery gauge, regen brakes, calculating the battery:incline:current speed vs how slow it'll be at the peak of that next hill:regen going down the hill:etc, it is pretty fun to drive (for someone 'a bit different'... like me).
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MaryAlana

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Re: Some simple math on a Toyota Yaris
« Reply #34 on: September 09, 2012, 02:09:17 PM »
My Korean built Chevy Aveo has amazing front room, so-so back seat and decent grocery space. I average about 38mpg overall, I have seen peaks of 42mpg in the summer. Bare bones car, only thing it has above basics is a radio. No A/C, 5 speed manual, no power anything.