Author Topic: Converting power created from a homemade generator  (Read 27325 times)

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Gitrmstr

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Converting power created from a homemade generator
« on: September 03, 2015, 01:11:10 PM »
Hello everyone, now that my homemade alternator is complete, it would be nice to know how to use it and measure it's output.

Hooking it up to my battery tester yields the result I expected, the needle moves up and down depending on the speed of the generator.

For someone new to this like myself, I find most of my information in books and online which often leaves me with many questions on the subject.

What is the best way to rectify  (if that's the correct word) the power generated from AC to DC? After having read about diodes and creating a bridge with them, it seems that would be the best way to go.

If it helps at all, I used the design from the Wood 103 found on your site.

Thanks in advance

Bruce S

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2015, 01:59:34 PM »
Gitrmstr;
 Welcome to the forum.
A full-wave bridge rectifier will be your best bet. BUT that also depends on your output.
Is it 3-phase or single phase?
There are rectifiers that will take in 3-phase and convert it to DC as well.
Other items the members here will need to help even better are: Battery voltage setup ? 12, 24, 32, 36, 48Vdc banks?
What after getting the voltage output correct and batteries charged are you looking to do with it? run a fridge? heat water? run well or irrigation pumps?
Operators are standing by  :P

Cheers
Bruce S
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Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2015, 02:11:08 PM »
Thank you for the quick reply!

It is a single phase setup, as for the eventual use for the power, my hopes would be to power a lightbulb or maybe charge a battery bank.

Considering the materials I used being what I could find for the cheapest price, I'm using ceramic block magnets and quite an inexact build made in my garage my guess of possibilities for the power created is quite low and wouldn't expect anything that could power an appliance.

Any advice is appreciated and I can't wait to continue fine-tuning and build more!

Bruce S

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2015, 02:35:53 PM »
OKAY powering a light bulb is a good place to start.
A full-wave bridge rectifier will take the single phase output and tun it into DC. IF you have electronics resale shops, you can probably get a professional made unit pretty cheap!
You can of course build your own, but even the 1N4001 diodes can vary from batch to batch. IF you have tons of them , then building a rectifier on the cheap is easy.

What experiences do you have? Do you happen to have a multi-meter or already have some output numbers ?
What is the AC output voltage of your setup?
Also a pic of the unit wold be pretty nice too  ;D

Bruce S
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Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2015, 03:38:58 PM »
I've always been interested in building and planning, and have access to some basic powertools which made this project a bit simpler. As for experiences, none in this type of build and work. But the wheels have been turning in my head on this idea for a while, starting with taking RC cars and spinning the motors in reverse.

After hooking it up to my multi-meter, I've encountered a problem. At slow speeds the needle bobs up and down which I assume is a result of the current alternating. At higher speeds of rotation the distance of the needle decreases and barely moves.

Unfortunately I'm not familiar with this field and have no output values for the AC current.

I will upload pictures as soon as possible!

Thanks again, Gitrmstr

Mary B

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2015, 03:47:51 PM »
Is your meter on AC or DC? To measure raw output from the generator use the AC setting often marked with ~ on the meter. After a rectifier use the DC setting.

Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2015, 04:20:37 PM »
After looking around my multimeter, there isn't an option to change the setting. Seeing as it is most definitely outdated by many years, it may be time to invest in a new one that would allow me to measure the AC power.

A picture of the coils(I believe it's called an armature, my terminology may be off).

And one of the rotor fitted with my ceramic block magnets.

Thanks for the help everyone!

electrondady1

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2015, 05:05:59 PM »
hello Gitrmstr. i like your radial flux alternator .  if you decide hang around here, just put a no.1 on it and start your next one .just about any electronic  repair place can sell you a rectifier or the 4 diodes required to build one .
 how do you spin the mags?




Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2015, 06:09:33 PM »
I plan on having the magnets spun either by a small windmill or a stationary bike. After looking into local wind patterns, and considering I won't be able to get it up high enough, I'm leaning towards the stationary bike idea.
I've learnt so much in the past few months of building and planning that I think I'm hooked on this type of thing  ;D

Bruce S

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2015, 07:00:35 AM »
On older meters where you have a needle that moves, there may be a place where you move the probes into a different hole.
Look for those on your meter, they will have stuff on them like 200V or 750V , OR send a pic of the meter , we can help from there too.

Telling us the needle bobs up and down , means you have an output of some sort, which is a good thing.
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Bruce S

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #10 on: September 04, 2015, 07:26:41 AM »
Gitrmstr:
Just to let you know. WE have not seen anyone take on a wooden build like this is years!
So I'm fairly certain most of the long term forum members will be looking on and try to be as helpful as possible!
 We know and understand that there will not be a large output, but getting it to work is the whole idea. right  ;D.
I like the way you embedded the ceramic magnets! 

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Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #11 on: September 04, 2015, 11:03:33 AM »
Thank you for the encouragement! I understand that the output won't be anything exceptional but seeing even the slightest generation has sparked an interest that I plan on pursuing!
On a side note, the plan I was following recommends a mix of magnetite to fill the core with to not have an air-core and to concentrate the magnetic field.
I could collect magnetite around my area but I'm wondering if it would be worth it.

As always thanks for the replies,
Gitrmstr

Bruce S

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #12 on: September 04, 2015, 11:29:26 AM »
IMO At this I would not bother with it. Let's get a base set of numbers.
See what it is currently doing and go from there.
 
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Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #13 on: September 04, 2015, 07:05:00 PM »
Alrighty, so I bought myself a multimeter that can measure AC current, and so far I have run into a few problems.
First off, the readings or astronomically low (no surprise there  :P) spinning it slowly maybe about 60 RPM the highest I got was a reading of 54 on the 2000μ setting, which after research turns out to be 0.000001.

Second, the reading while in AC mode fluctuates from positive to negative regularly. After checking that all my magnets are configured in an alternating outward facing pole fashion. I fear in my attempts to alternate the winding direction of the coils I may have messed it up. Would that cause the positive and negative reasons?

And a quick side question, any suggestions on a next project if this doesn't pan out? Maybe an axial flux alternator.

Thanks in advance

dnix71

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #14 on: September 04, 2015, 07:54:25 PM »
Short the output and try to spin it by hand. If it's hard to spin then you have it set up correctly. If it spins freely with the output shorted then go back and look at the design and construction.

Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #15 on: September 04, 2015, 08:49:44 PM »
How would I go about shorting the output? I can't seem to find any information about this

dnix71

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #16 on: September 04, 2015, 09:52:22 PM »
Connect the output wires to each other instead of a load or volt meter.

electrondady1

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #17 on: September 05, 2015, 07:19:00 AM »
can you draw a stater circuit diagram? i have some real doubt about it from your photo.
looks like the red lead has two wires attached and the black lead is attached to the wrong coil.
in single phase,
 it's, start to tail to tail to start to start to tail to tail to start  etc. until all the coils are in series.

 

Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #18 on: September 05, 2015, 10:08:09 AM »
Here is the stator circuit diagram
 
Right now the ends of Side A are attached to the ends of Side B, then each one of those is attached to the leads. One Side A-Side B pair to the red lead of the voltmeter, and the same on the other side.

Harold in CR

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #19 on: September 05, 2015, 11:35:39 AM »

 Appears to me that the first 2 coils of Side A are the same rotation of windings. Then, they alternate.

 Could be a typo or not matter that much, but, it's not correct as each coil should be reversed alternate direction winding.

 Look at your sketch carefully, to if you made a mistake drawing it, or a mistake in the coild connection, rotation of winding.

 

Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #20 on: September 05, 2015, 11:53:59 AM »
Thank you for bringing that to my attention. It would appear I made a mistake in winding the coils of side A in the second coil. How much of an impact would that make?

Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #21 on: September 06, 2015, 08:57:09 PM »
Glad to see the site up and running again! I have made progress with my generator project and have been eager to share it with you guys. First, I fixed the circuitry problem where the coil direction wasn't alternating. I also believe I had my voltmeter leads hooked up wrong prior as electrondady had mentioned. They are all attached to da higher until the last two where the leads then connect.
After making these changes, on the 200v AC setting on my new multimeter, spinning it with my fingers yielded a reading of 0.2!!! It's an understatement to say I was happy :p

electrondady1

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #22 on: September 07, 2015, 07:32:58 AM »
now you need a LED lite in the circuit.
strangely enough  a flashing light is satisfying on many levels


hiker

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #23 on: September 09, 2015, 01:07:44 AM »
You Need some iron in their--get some flat bar iron -from lows,,,Home Depot,,toss some under your mags,,,also in the coil hole..might gog a bit,, But your power out put will be way more,,,😜

WILD in ALASKA

hiker

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #24 on: September 09, 2015, 01:18:21 AM »
Form a ring from some flat Bar iron ,,mount your coils to that,,cut some small section to fit in the coil holes,,stack them,,,your power out put would be even more,,I made such a alt for a exercise bike,,mounted mags on the flywheel made a metal ring for coils to be mounted on,,also added metal to the inside of mag holes,,works great,,,it's a 20-15 alt. 3phase,,,😊
WILD in ALASKA

Harold in CR

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #25 on: September 09, 2015, 07:45:51 AM »

 Hiker, is this correct ??
Quote
also added metal to the inside of mag holes


 Should this be COIL holes ??  Down here, I can get magnetite right off the beach. Also, one time I read where someone took coat hanger wire and cut short pieces and stacked them inside coils and epoxied them in place.

 I'm presently building a 10" saw blade axial flux with 6 coils and 8 magnets on 2 rotor plates. Coils are spaced a bit apart. I MAY need to rewind them much thinner, to expand the width of them, closer to touching, if that sounds right. I have 18ga magnet wire, with 100 turns at 1/2" thick coils. Made the winding jig to be exactly hole size to fit the N48 1-1/2 x 3/4 x 1/4" neo mags.

 If I can get 12-24 V at 5-10A, I would be happy.

 Any input on this, would be appreciated, and, possibly helpful for the OP.

 Thanks

hiker

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #26 on: September 09, 2015, 12:21:19 PM »
Your right--coil holes,,,this dam cell phone ,,,lost my regular ISp,,so Im  temp, posting on it,,now that I think about it,,he would most likely have a real cogger with metal in the coil holes--being that it's a single phase alt with mags covering all the coils,,metal backing should work fine,,,your alt sounds on track,,,wire might be a bit light ,,16 would give more amps,,  okay this typing on a cell phone is driving me nuts--later,,😜😜😜
WILD in ALASKA