Author Topic: Converting power created from a homemade generator  (Read 24446 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Harold in CR

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 443
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #27 on: September 09, 2015, 12:32:47 PM »
 :) :) :) Thanks for struggling with a reply, Hiker. Appreciated.  :)

electrondady1

  • SuperHero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2805
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #28 on: September 09, 2015, 01:32:48 PM »
i doubt  one saw blade is thick enough to contain all the flux in a 1/4" neo .
 i built some rotors with stacked hard drive mags and two blades per rotor were required .

Harold in CR

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 443
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #29 on: September 09, 2015, 05:13:15 PM »

 Good catch. I DO have double saw blades for each rotor.  ::) ;D

Gitrmstr

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 55
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #30 on: September 10, 2015, 05:11:33 PM »
Thanks for all the replies! and I apologies for my lack of communication in the past couple of days.

Harold, would the iron pieces be the dimension of my magnets? and how thick should the pieces be?
Also, would I just make the grooves that hold the magnets deeper to accommodate the new thickness of the magnets and iron?
Furthermore, I've decided to go with a VAWT design for my backyard considering the inconsistent wind conditions. After looking at designs I'm leaning towards a two blade design, but haven't been able to find information on what works best concerning pitch and number of blades.
As usual, thanks in advance, I look forward to your replies.

Gitrmstr

Harold in CR

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 443
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #31 on: September 10, 2015, 05:33:14 PM »

 I believe an iron ring with the magnets stuck to it, is what Hiker was referring to. I made a radial flux alternator, using a car alternator. Turned an aluminum hub to fit inside the stator and a groove deep enough for an iron, (water pipe) ring under the magnets, then epoxied all that together. Thing cogs pretty bad, so, my Vertical turbine won't start unless the wind gets to 20MPH.

 Axials usually use metal discs of some sort for the magnets and a plywood plate for the coils, all encased with Polyester resin or epoxy resin.

hiker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1492
  • BIG DOG
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #32 on: September 10, 2015, 06:25:22 PM »
you mentioned it was going to be powered by a bike...if not then you most likely dont want to use the iron-except under your mags.
heres a shot of that bike alt. its just a test setup up as of now -coils taped down..used field coil wire from a old alt.-i belive ile rewire with # 17 and add another piece of metal to each coil hole to bring the airgap closer--being that its a 3 phase cogging is no big issue..with ceramic mags topped off with some small neos..
as of now i get about 60 open volts and maxed out at 8 amps--not as good as i expected.  with # 17 wire amps should go way up....its a 20-15 alt...
WILD in ALASKA

Gitrmstr

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 55
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #33 on: September 10, 2015, 07:05:30 PM »
Yes I forgot it was for a bike, I guess using wind power wouldn't yield any useable electricity. I will continue with the bike plan.

The whole iron ring with the magnets attached seems a bit complicated. Would I have to remake my stator? Or should I start from scratch and maybe plan a bit better?

hiker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1492
  • BIG DOG
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #34 on: September 10, 2015, 08:15:58 PM »
It's not really--just some plywood cutouts glued together ,,with a flat bar curved inside,,then just a bunch of small oblong metal squares stacked and super glued together,, for the coil holes,,then just a simple handheld coil winder from some scrap wood,,,it's a slow process 😛😛 check Facebook in anch. Alaska--bill Wallner--I just posted a vid on their,,,,,well hope it works out for you,,,,,,,
WILD in ALASKA

electrondady1

  • SuperHero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2805
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #35 on: September 11, 2015, 05:41:17 AM »
very difficult to evolve your present wooden core alternator into some thing that puts out much juice.

go down to canadian tire and buy two cheap skill saw/table saw blades.
buy another 8 mags like the ones you have.
strip the mags out of your wooden alternator
glue them down to the saw blades
you can reuse the copper to build a stator for
 a dual rotor axial flux  alternator .
that is the standard alternator configuration built on this site .
« Last Edit: September 11, 2015, 05:49:23 AM by electrondady1 »

electrondady1

  • SuperHero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2805
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #36 on: September 11, 2015, 07:00:21 PM »
i have nothing against radial flux
Ive been saving  up magnets like yours for a while now
I've got 56 of them on a shelf for a big dia. alternator vertical axis mill.
i was thinking of going radial

Gitrmstr

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 55
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #37 on: September 12, 2015, 04:08:10 PM »
Thank you for the recommendation electron! Would my 24 gauge wire be suitable for the dual rotor axial flux alternator you suggested? I'm very interested in continuing with tinkering and building more!

electrondady1

  • SuperHero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2805
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #38 on: September 12, 2015, 09:11:01 PM »
how did you come up with the turn count for your radial ?   see what one of your  coils will produce at you target rpm. it's customary to do a test coil to get a useful voltage at the target  rpm

Gitrmstr

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 55
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #39 on: September 13, 2015, 03:37:56 PM »
I just fit as many on as I could haha, I think it ended up being 30. I will sketch up some designs tonight and report back here with the design and some questions!

Gitrmstr

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 55
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #40 on: September 15, 2015, 03:27:27 PM »
About the dual rotor axial flux alternator described a few posts above, what would the saw blades be attached to allowing them to spin in synchronization with each other? Furthermore, would the saw blades count as a steel backing to increase the strength of the magnets? Also, are rectangular shape coils good for this design? or would a tall trapezoidal shape be better?

Finally, would a standard 6 gear bike be good enough to either directly drive the rotors or would an additional gearing system be required to produce the required RPMS? (I realise it may not be possible to answer this question without knowing the coil count).

hiker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1492
  • BIG DOG
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #41 on: September 15, 2015, 06:11:15 PM »
heres one i built a few years back---stator is plywood with coil cutouts -coils are epoxyed in place..might be of some help....
two diffrant mills..
WILD in ALASKA

hiker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1492
  • BIG DOG
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #42 on: September 15, 2015, 06:18:41 PM »
test stand...another old mill --i flew on the back of my motorhome for years...
WILD in ALASKA

electrondady1

  • SuperHero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2805
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #43 on: September 16, 2015, 06:16:59 AM »
hiker used threaded rod but Princess auto has 5/8" cold rolled steel axial shafts , locking collars and a good selection of bearings.
yes the steel blades contain the magnetic flux.

i use a round piece of wood as a center section. glued to one of the blades.  i drill 4 holes in the steel blade and wood to retain 4 bolts that will act as height adjustment  to give the proper clearance between the stator and the magnet rotors.



Gitrmstr

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 55
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #44 on: September 16, 2015, 08:34:30 PM »
Thanks for all the ideas!

Concerning the circular saw blades as a rotor for the magnets, what size diameter would I be looking at? Would it be wise to iron out the details of my coils such as shape and size, then place them as close together and then place the magnets accordingly?

electrondady1

  • SuperHero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2805
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #45 on: September 18, 2015, 05:46:59 AM »
you have to fit an even number of mags on each rotor with spacing between them about the same width as the magnet . can be a bit tighter maybe i/2 the width of a mag. once that is done you can start messing with a test coil.



Gitrmstr

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 55
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #46 on: September 18, 2015, 03:33:19 PM »
I will be getting the saw blades and bearings and the rod this weekend, after setting it all up I'll post some pictures and coil results

hiker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1492
  • BIG DOG
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #47 on: September 18, 2015, 06:39:23 PM »
heres a 9 and 12 setup--9 coils--12 mags  per rotor...3 phase -3 coils per phase...its easy once you get it... : }


WILD in ALASKA

Gitrmstr

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 55
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #48 on: September 20, 2015, 04:24:20 PM »
Hello everyone!

After shopping this weekend I purchased more magnets, 5/8" threaded rod and saw blades.

Is that spacing between the magnets good enough?

Also, how would I go about testing a coil?
Thanks in advance.

electrondady1

  • SuperHero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2805
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #49 on: September 21, 2015, 06:06:52 AM »
cool set up.
now you need something like one or two of these and attach it to something solid like your work bench.

electrondady1

  • SuperHero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2805
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #50 on: September 21, 2015, 06:25:10 AM »
if the mags are glued down to the rotor and attached to the threaded rod you can spin the mag rotor  freely in the bearing.(princess auto has all kinds of bearings)
i normally place one rotor on the shaft and cover it with a piece of thin card board. now you can place the coil on the cardboard surface and spin up to speed . keep your fingers well away from the teeth of the saw blade/mag rotor.
 
i use a musical metronome to give me 60 beats per minuet . when i spin the rotors in sink with that metronome i know I'm turning it at 60 rpm which is my target rpm.(about 1/3 of the vertical axis mills top speed.

you want to get a usable voltage at an attainable rpm. with just one rotor involved it will give you about half the voltage of two rotors.




« Last Edit: September 21, 2015, 06:34:34 AM by electrondady1 »

Gitrmstr

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 55
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #51 on: September 23, 2015, 05:20:41 PM »
Thanks electrondady! I will be headed to princess auto this weekend to purchase some bearings and pillow blocks.

Gitrmstr

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 55
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #52 on: October 08, 2015, 07:18:49 PM »
Good evening folks, sorry for the long lapse in replies!

I've obtained all the required materials including the bearings. After setting it up I have made a 50 turn test coil with my wire, but I'm not getting any readings while I spin the rotor with my hand. Am I just not reaching a reasonable speed? I will be hooking it up to my bike this weekend and will hopefully get some readings to share with you all.

electrondady1

  • SuperHero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2805
  • Country: ca
Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #53 on: October 09, 2015, 07:40:44 AM »
so the mags are down nsnsns
 if your still building in single phase the coil legs have to be wide enough to be over two mags at once. as in a mag width plus 1/2 a space.