Author Topic: Converting power created from a homemade generator  (Read 24445 times)

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Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #54 on: October 09, 2015, 08:17:36 AM »
I was thinking of going three-phase for this project. But as of now I only have one coil up to test it but no numbers. Thanks

Bruce S

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #55 on: October 09, 2015, 09:20:28 AM »
This has probably already been covered, but if you're not getting any readings from the meter, what settings to you have on the meter? DC or AC?
50 turns of what size wire? I may have missed the size your are using.
50 turns of even 30 ga wire (0.25mm) should have a decent voltage , even turning by hand.
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Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #56 on: October 09, 2015, 02:27:56 PM »
Thank you for the reply Bruce, I have my multimeter set to read AC current, and I'm using 24 gauge wire.

Bruce S

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #57 on: October 09, 2015, 02:51:31 PM »
Hopefully, it's AC voltage :).
 Try setting it for the lowest AC voltage , my freebie's starts at 200Vac but will show all the way down to 1.5Vac with a sustained output such as a transformer.
I normally much prefer the "swing needle" types they show pretty quick!
A easier way for you could be to use a drill, just chuck it in, spin it up! ATM it won't matter the RPMs you just want to know that it's producing output. Next step would be to know the RPMs , and voltage.

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Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #58 on: October 09, 2015, 07:47:06 PM »
I'm making power!!!  ;D
Spinning it with my fingers yields some results, too late to start writing them down and doing calculations! Will update in the morning.

Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #59 on: October 10, 2015, 04:19:28 PM »
Alright, so spinning one rotor at 60 rpm with the coil beside it yielded a max reading of 15.6 at the 200V AC setting. 60 RPM should be easily attainable on a bike, would increasing the RPM boost the voltage?

What should my next step be? Should I test other sizes of coil turns and see what would work best?

Thanks in advance.

electrondady1

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #60 on: October 11, 2015, 06:20:09 AM »
that's a lot of voltage for one coil . with ceramic mags and just one rotor.

 

Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #61 on: October 11, 2015, 07:42:29 AM »
That was a spike, the average was about 9.8 at the 200 V AC micro setting. After research I haven`t been able to fully understand how much that is concerning the measurement.

OperaHouse

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #62 on: October 11, 2015, 10:59:59 AM »
If that is micro amps AC, that is not a lot of voltage.  I would be concerned for the safety of the meter on that setting but most meters that can measure that low on AC have good protection.

Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #63 on: October 11, 2015, 02:29:53 PM »
It is set to the 200V micro setting. I bought the meter from Canadian tire and it seems to be quite sturdy so I`m not worried. So at 60 rpm making that kind of micro voltage should I increase the amount of turns on the coil? Or get a new gauge of coil entirely.

electrondady1

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #64 on: October 11, 2015, 07:25:15 PM »
these guys don't know anything about canadian tire or princess auto.
i 'm not talking about hurting your meter .
what I'm saying is that is a remarkable level of voltage for a test coil using half the magnetic flux on a single coil @60 rpm.
your talking about getting a charging voltage from one coil  and half the mags
if your going 3 phase you only need  one more coil  per phase.
  at that  rate of output your talking (9.8 volts per coil.)
almost 20 volts with both rotors in place
and something like 40 x1.74 x1.4-1.4= 96 volts dc  .
 i don't think so .
i think your getting maybe 1.5 volts per coil with half the mags at 60 rpm.


 





electrondady1

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #65 on: October 11, 2015, 07:56:27 PM »
1.5x2 rotors=3 volts per coil
3 x 2 coils =6 volts per phase.
6volts x 1.74 for 3 phase in star=10.44
10.44 x1.4 for rectification =14.6
14.6-1.4 voltage drop through the rectifiers =13.2 volts dc at 60 rpm


so if your actually getting .98 volts on the test coil...
« Last Edit: October 11, 2015, 08:06:48 PM by electrondady1 »

Mary B

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #66 on: October 12, 2015, 12:13:27 AM »
You might be set on milli volts... aka 1/1000 of a volt... have a model number of the meter so we can look at it and check your settings?

Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #67 on: October 12, 2015, 06:43:45 AM »
The model number is 052-0060-2, mastercraft. I do believe it's set to milli volts or microvolts, as it has the small u symbol under the 200 AC setting

electrondady1

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #68 on: October 12, 2015, 08:51:19 AM »
it was late last night when i posted.
  i could have added that 13.2 volts dc was about right.
what i do is work the formula backwards from 14 volts dc @60 rpm
to find what each coil must produce.
you can add turns to your coil to bring it up to that .

the think is, 60 rpm is maybe 1/3 of what a drag vertical will cut in at .
hawts much higher rpm, like 120 rpm.
if you are doing a bike alternator you can pick any speed your want with gears and pulleys.
the faster you spin it the more power it makes
the more turns you put on the more volts you get.
the fatter the wire the more amps you get.
 
you will need at least  clearance of 2mm or 1/6 between your stator and mags . make sure your test set up is close to that.

Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #69 on: October 12, 2015, 12:13:13 PM »
Okay, so I should see what rpm I can attain comfortably on the bike, then start seeing how many turns of the coil I would need. At what point would I start thinking about going down wire size to fit more coils into a smaller area.

Thanks in advance! This is getting really exciting

Mary B

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #70 on: October 12, 2015, 02:03:37 PM »
Okay I think you are on the wrong setting, that is current... your meter has a section with 750 and 200 and a ~ over a V. That is you AC volt range. the 200u setting is microamps and not what you want.

The model number is 052-0060-2, mastercraft. I do believe it's set to milli volts or microvolts, as it has the small u symbol under the 200 AC setting

Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #71 on: October 12, 2015, 02:27:37 PM »
Thanks Mary! On the 200 setting I'm not getting a reading unfortunately, shall I keep adding turns to the coil until I get some numbers? Or try and increase the rpm

Bruce S

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #72 on: October 12, 2015, 03:02:11 PM »
Since you already have the coil made, I believe it best to start by increasing the RPM.
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electrondady1

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #73 on: October 13, 2015, 06:40:09 AM »
post an image of your meter and post an image of your coil laid over the mags.

Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #74 on: October 13, 2015, 02:21:02 PM »

Close-up of the voltmeter


Single rotor on bearings assembly


Coil set beside the rotor. Normally it's much closer but made the gap wider for viewing purposes.


Coil fastened to a cereal box, each end attached to one of the leads of the voltmeter.

Hope this helps!

electrondady1

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #75 on: October 14, 2015, 08:13:04 AM »
 
every thing looks ok.
if your willing to experiment a bit more ,

in a 6 coil 8 mag 3 phase alternator, individual coils must reside inside a 60 degree segment of a circle . 360/6
the coils can form a trapezoid within that space.
it's a tapered coil.
basically your widening the outside width of the coil a bit in order to have the legs of the coil traverse over two mags for the maximum time.


Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #76 on: October 14, 2015, 09:18:20 AM »
Sounds like a plan! Would I make a single test cool in that shape/size and try to get a reading off tha?

dave ames

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #77 on: October 14, 2015, 10:15:38 AM »

Cheers Gitrmstr!

Looking good, well done with the cereal box test coil holder. ;)

Hard to tell from here but looks like the black meter lead wants to go to the center COM port on your meter?

Following along in Connecticut, Dave

Mary B

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #78 on: October 14, 2015, 04:26:56 PM »
Good catch Dave! Yes the black lead needs to be in the center COM connector!

Gitrmstr

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #79 on: October 14, 2015, 06:29:28 PM »
That makes a lot of sense looking at the meter more closely! Dopey move on my part :P
Unfortunately, still no reading at 60rpm with the test coil at 50 turn.

Would my next step be to make the trapezoidal test coil that electrondady suggested? If so, how many turns should I try? If there's no voltage result from the first test, would I then attempt to increase the rpm?

Again, thank you Dave! I appreciate your help and compliments!

Thanks in advance

electrondady1

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Re: Converting power created from a homemade generator
« Reply #80 on: October 15, 2015, 06:24:23 AM »
your back to no reading at all?

did you burn or scrape off the insulation for an inch from the ends of the coil.
use sand paper to get it down to shiny bare metal?