Author Topic: Urban legend?  (Read 2956 times)

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kenobrock

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Urban legend?
« on: January 29, 2016, 06:06:50 PM »
I have read and heard about people using an induction coil near high tension power lines to turn stray voltage into usable electric. Is this possible or not. 

electrondady1

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Re: Urban legend?
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2016, 05:55:45 AM »
i remember wind stuff ed posting he had gotten some leds to light up on a line layed beneath  power lines

tanner0441

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Re: Urban legend?
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2016, 12:28:35 PM »
Hi

Some years ago in the UK we had to have a light on any car that was parked on the street overnight. To save the battery leaving the side lights on all night people had a single lamp that clipped on the door window.

There were several people who built units that, if they lived close enough, took the signal from the BBC Long Wave transmitter and charged a big capacitor up, this was fed to the bulb and the parking light lit up without draining the battery.

Then the powers that be got wind of it, and lots of people were taken to court and charged with stealing electricity.

If you try it and you are successful don't shout about it too loudly in case some smart ass tries to earn himself browney points at your expense.

Brian

Mary B

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Re: Urban legend?
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2016, 04:30:53 PM »
Many have gone to jail for it, it is theft of electricity! There was a farmer near me who had a fence under the power lines, he found he could power part of the house with it. But it showed up as a parasitic drain to the power company.

David HK

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Re: Urban legend?
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2016, 08:09:28 PM »
I have heard of, or read, in years past, that a single fluorescent tube attached to a long pole and slowly pushed towards an overhead power line - 400 KV  and such like - will begin to glow.



Dave

SparWeb

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Re: Urban legend?
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2016, 12:51:40 PM »
Somebody once planted more than a thousand fluorescent bulbs in the ground, in a field directly under a high-tension power line.

No one believes the theory except the one who developed it.  Everyone believes the experiment except the one who ran it.

System spec: 135w BP multicrystalline panels, regulated by Xantrex C40, DIY 8ft diameter wind turbine, regulated by Tri-Star TS60, 800AH x 24V AGM Battery, Xantrex SW4024

DamonHD

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Re: Urban legend?
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2016, 02:10:15 PM »
A great place to dig a pond and farm some (very confused) electric eels!

Rgds

Damon

ronbot

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Re: Urban legend?
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2016, 08:38:05 PM »
Hi

Some years ago in the UK we had to have a light on any car that was parked on the street overnight. To save the battery leaving the side lights on all night people had a single lamp that clipped on the door window.

There were several people who built units that, if they lived close enough, took the signal from the BBC Long Wave transmitter and charged a big capacitor up, this was fed to the bulb and the parking light lit up without draining the battery.

Then the powers that be got wind of it, and lots of people were taken to court and charged with stealing electricity.

If you try it and you are successful don't shout about it too loudly in case some smart ass tries to earn himself browney points at your expense.

Brian


That's silly... it's a radio transmitter, intentionally sending out energy for intended reception. So what if my "radio receiver" 'happens' to store some of the 'signal' and light up an LED?  It's not stealing, they would not be able to prove it caused their transmitter an undesired "drain". Nor can they prove it affects the signal reception by anyone else's radios. Crystal radio sets utilize the transmitted power directly to drive the headphones, are they illegal?

In fact, there are now... on the market... devices designed specifically to receive broadband radio signals, rectify them, and use them for IOT devices.

Did you ever think about why it is that having 1,000,000 radios does not decrease the transmitted signal?  ...and even if you added 1,000,000 more, my radio receiver signal won't get any weaker?

Tesla thought a lot about that... it's what his "Magnifying Transmitter" at Wardenclyffe counted-on... AC power distribution free to the masses... just install a specific antenna and reception device, and free electricity.  Once you move to the transmitter energy out of normal electro-magnetic transmission and into wavelets or longitudinal waves, adding millions of receivers won't subtract from the original power.

Timbersawz

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Re: Urban legend?
« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2016, 05:55:19 AM »
Years ago I was fencing on a farm under the big power pylons. On foggy mornings started getting shocks off it. The more wires we put on that 7 wire, the worst it got.

We ended up only doing wire work in the afternoons and put in posts during the morning, not fun!!