Author Topic: wind turbines haters  (Read 1688 times)

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Mary B

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Re: wind turbines haters
« Reply #27 on: March 16, 2017, 05:57:50 PM »
Suzlon used to have a blade plant 75 miles SW of me in Pipestone, MN.  The closed down when Suzlon went through some rough times in MN getting permits to put up turbines on Buffalo Ridge.


tanner0441

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Re: wind turbines haters
« Reply #28 on: March 17, 2017, 12:29:18 PM »
Hi
 
I find it amusing people will drive for miles to look at windmills and wax lyrical about the romantic gentle swish as they grind flour, or pump water. The dutch sell thousands of pictures of them.

Then stick a generator on them and make the blades out of GRP and stop calling them sails and it flicks a switch in some peoples head and they scream doom and gloom and wax on this time about the unconfirmed number of winged creatures that meet their demise entangled in the thrashing blades of these machines from hell.

I don't think people in rural areas and countries where a wind turbine is their only source of power will be jumping on the turbine bashing band wagon.

As  post script how many birds are killed in oil spills, or is that acceptable collateral damage.

Brian....

Ungrounded Lightning Rod

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Re: wind turbines haters
« Reply #29 on: March 21, 2017, 11:26:20 PM »
I find it amusing people will drive for miles to look at windmills and wax lyrical about the romantic gentle swish as they grind flour, or pump water. The dutch sell thousands of pictures of them.

Then stick a generator on them and make the blades out of GRP and stop calling them sails and it flicks a switch in some peoples head and they scream doom and gloom ...

Comparing an efficient "lift" type HAWT to a Dutch-style mill IS getting into the apples-to-pears territory.

An efficient turbine runs at a tip speed ratio of 6 or more (regardless of scale and the higher the more efficient, though you're getting into diminishing-returns territory above about 8 ).  If the furling fails during a wind storm with 100 MPH sustained gusts, the tips of those blades are approaching (or exceeding) the speed of sound - until the vibrations and/or centripetal forces cause an "unscheduled disably".  Then you have some very heavy chunks flying or spinning at about mach one...

A Dutch-type windmill coming apart in a severe storm can be expected to throw smaller and lighter chunks at speeds that are not in the same ballpark.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 11:46:22 PM by Ungrounded Lightning Rod »