Author Topic: 2015 Nissan Leaf battery modules  (Read 3879 times)

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Mary B

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Re: 2015 Nissan Leaf battery modules
« Reply #27 on: July 27, 2017, 07:00:09 PM »
Some drilling rigs are now burning flare gas in the drilling engines, that takes care of some of it. Main reason it isn't collected is lack of pipelines to transport it. By the time it is compressed, cleaned, loaded on a truck and driven to a pipeline head it is worth next to zero.

george65

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Re: 2015 Nissan Leaf battery modules
« Reply #28 on: July 27, 2017, 08:58:49 PM »
Electric cars have not reached the technical peak needed for cold weather climates where the battery life can be cut in half. Meaning I wouldn't have the range to go to the store and back form my rural location...

I think this is another "difficulty" with electrics.
I would imagine a large percentage of people would do the great majority of their journeys within the range of electrics such as the daily Commute to work and running around the weekends.
The problem comes when you want to go on holidays or to visit distant family etc. That may only be a few times a year and constitute a small part of your over all miles but what is the option? Have an IC vehicle as well ..... with more repayments, another rego, insurance, space to garage/ park it.... all for a small amount of journeys.  OTOH, you could just have that one vehicle and do everything and the cost of Rego and insurance let alone repayments will more than make up for any higher running expenses of an EV.

Perhaps in the future they will make EV's with accessory battery packs that you can slot in for long journeys to get extra range.
Of course that is the complete opposite of what most people, especially families want. Less luggage space when they need it most.
And then of course you have to recharge the thing when you get to where you are going if not along the way.  Your roadside stop is now going to be 90 min to 2 hours instead of 1. They better have a REALLY good playground there for the kids and something to amuse the parents as well.
Maybe beds will be needed because the length of your trip is now going to blow out as well and what was a day trip is now well and truly an over nighter.... which will cause more people to fly on fossil fueled planes with more congestion around airports and.....

These things really do have a huge knock on effect......

It's going to be unimaginably difficult to create another fuel base that will suit every purpose like IC engines do.
I often wonder if we got it right all along and Fossil fuels are the only thing that will do what we want and we have already got the best solution, for all the shortcomings it may have.

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Until that happens it is all a bunch of hot air from politicians without a clue to the science involved.

The brow beating to be green and environmental is getting/ got over the top. The mention of green is supposed to have you falling on bended knee to the cult of save the planet to which no proposal, no matter how ludicrous, has to be worshiped and believed without question.
I'm all for the environment but I'm dead against hypocrisy that makes something out to be what is not, just to appease the ignorant who swallow everything they are spoon fed.

We need ideas which are realistic, practical, workable and actualy do achieve a real net result. Everything so far is substitute a more toxic or inefficient system for the one we already have and move the emissions from one place to another and then call the vehicle " emissions free"
What a crock.

The whole infrastructure and process needs to be looked at and doable before the idea is ever near put into place.

Bruce S

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Re: 2015 Nissan Leaf battery modules
« Reply #29 on: July 28, 2017, 07:14:30 AM »
One of the things that makes it possible for the UK to do this is one of distances.
I think, that from the North tip of UK to Southern tip is less than for me to drive from my home Missouri to visit friends in San Fransisco, CA.
So for the UK to say OKAY folks we're banning petrol based vehicles in 33 years, it's one of distances, and where the populace is located. It would be interesting to read what they're going to do about the already "owned" cars. Will the force the owners to pony up for a EV? I'm thinking they wold have a small revolt happening if they told the farmers they had to give up those  :o, could be wrong tho. The Britts have had to give a whole lot more in the past( including the colonies  ;D ;D ;D).

I like the design of the Volt, I like the idea that it's a Hybrid with the idea that the ICE is mainly for charging not driving once the car is up past 40mph. I certainly like what the crowds are doing with the 1st gen ones. Similar to what was posted here about plugging into it for Glamping . Plus the whole industry that takes the Prius, does the add-on extra battery pack and off you go.

What I do not like is the price tag!!! I can buy a small house with 1/2acre of land for less just a mere 1.5 hours outside St. Louis , and that's with the "incentives".

Even here is the middle of the USA, there's a small "quiet" industry that is rebuilding battery packs for the Toyota's that are off battery warranty and people are refusing to pay the $6Gs for a new pack.
I helped a neighbor rebuild his (1 bad module) and even including the charger/balancer it was less than $300USD these are of course NiMH and you have to actually read the instructions otherwise the module will swell up and be worthless and the packs weighs in at 400Lbs , but that pales in comparison to the $6Gs!! and it was fun too.

Harold CR, you might have a nice cottage industry there SIR!!
A kind word often goes unsaid BUT never goes unheard

Harold in CR

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Re: 2015 Nissan Leaf battery modules
« Reply #30 on: July 28, 2017, 08:18:03 AM »
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Harold CR, you might have a nice cottage industry there

 It is a possibility, Bruce. Problem is getting things shipped in a timely manner. Wife will call shipper today and ream some butt. It's 1 week from being 3 months they have had possession of our crate. We live 1.5 hours from their warehouse, but, they will hold our crate until they have enough deliveries out our way.

 I even offered some extra for a quicker delivery, but, they just don't care. Problem is, this is the only door to door delivery service in CR that I can find.

DamonHD

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Re: 2015 Nissan Leaf battery modules
« Reply #31 on: July 28, 2017, 11:32:30 AM »
Harold: have we hijacked your thread enough?  Do you want to start a new one?

Anyhow, this just came through one of my feeds:

https://about.bnef.com/blog/shell-ceo-van-beurden-says-his-next-car-will-be-electric/

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When the boss of Europe’s biggest listed oil company says his next car will be electric, it says a lot about the future of fossil fuels.

So the practical grid issues that George alludes to are very real and cannot be ignored or wished away, but I think will be manageable (switching to all-electric heat here in the UK would be about 10x the extra grid load by comparison, if done badly, I think).

But Shell and BP and others actually seem to think that the (EV) transition is happening and they are rolling with it.

Rgds

Damon

Harold in CR

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Re: 2015 Nissan Leaf battery modules
« Reply #32 on: July 28, 2017, 01:54:19 PM »
 I have no problem with the hijacking, being as how I am contributing to it.  ;D  At least the thread is getting some attention.  :)  Also, I just read an article where Aus is about to install 80 Charging stations on the main road of the Gold Coast.

 Need to look and find the link.

 Thanks for checking, Damon   8)

george65

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Re: 2015 Nissan Leaf battery modules
« Reply #33 on: July 28, 2017, 06:35:49 PM »

It's actually 18 Stations which is a reasonable thing.
Clearly aimed at tourists however all being along the seaboard.  Queensland is a bit like Texas, it's bloody big. Putting all the stations along one road essentially is a start I suppose but it does not address how people are going to get there in the first place being a state Govt. Initiative.

A thought occoured reading the posts here and I see it was mentioned in an article...... Do all cars use the same Charging port?
Clearly, the answer is no. Not in fast mode at least.  I think the manufacturers should nip that one in the Bud straight off before we go back to a VHS/beta scenario and people have to go to the right station or face flat battery's.

Which is another thing..... Won't be any road service crews bringing a jerry can of petrol to get you going again, they will either have to have a fossil fueled generator to give you a few KM range ( OR much more) to get to a recharge station or it will be a tow job.
I think standardising charging ports would be an almost imperative thing to do at this point but then you are going to probably have variations in technology given the infancy of the whole  EV thing.

I could not find any info on how many recharging spaces will be at each station. One would hope they are proportional to need.  The Gold coast is Australias Holiday playground and it's busy ally year round. At Christmas it's completely nuts so around The gold coast area itself, a strip of about 30 KM, is going to need when EV's amount to something, literally thousands of stations to cater for the several hundred thousand tourists alone that resident there and growing population.  I wanted to buy there myself instead of where I did buy last week but unfortunately the Wife and daughter would not go.  Beautiful place, could have lived in an offensive size mansion for what I paid in semi rural Sydney. Probably my last chance at hat dream but anyway.

The articles state there are 700 Ev's in Qld, half of which are Hybrids which doesn't make them EV's at all to me.  I guess for a while the 18 stations will be adequate  but will have to be increased as the EV takeup as the govt wants progresses...... Which brings me to another thought......
Road infrastructure here is always lagging behind and our roads are mostly atrocious.  If they can't maintain the roads now, where is the funding going to come from to keep pace with the stations?
It's not just putting them in, it's buying the land for them.  Who is going to pay for that?

Right now all these stations are free. If private enterprise gets into them with oil companies being the prime candidates given they already have locations, What is the cost going to be? Power prices have just taken a hike here again and you can bet the oil companies see an opportunity and will, like fuel now, charge to kill. Pun intended.

I have always said that oil will never be replaced until there is more profit for the oil companies and Govts in something else due to the massive investment in infrastructure already in place and that which would be required to replace oil. Given what it's going to take to set up these EV stations and the companies having to look after their investors and share holders, I see no reason why Charging stations will not cost more proportionaly that Petroleum.  They have the legitimate investment to recoup but they also have something much more important, the do the right thing/ save the planet/ guilt trip factor.

We already have the "Buy green power at twice the price" crap thrown at us with our home electricity, imagine what the fuel companies can do with that.
All the pictures of rolling green hills and bright skies with the tali pipe less car cruising along the idealic road..... With the cooling towers of the Coal or nuke power station just to the left out of shot and make sure you don't get any of the trucks carrying the waste in frame either.

Question for the green motivated....... With mention of the UK above, I looked up their generation methods. Gas was the top one and there was a figure for Co2 emissions.  Then I looked at the nuke and there was another figure for co2 as was there for Wind turbines and solar.
Can someone please tell me how the f duck you get co2 emissions from solar, wind turbines... or nuke?
I'm already smelling some spin doctoring guilt tripping here but I await to hear how this is calculated and how solar supposedly has Co2 emissions?

DamonHD

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Re: 2015 Nissan Leaf battery modules
« Reply #34 on: July 29, 2017, 03:23:43 AM »
I have been running this live grid intensity calculator for a while:

http://www.earth.org.uk/_gridCarbonIntensityGB.html

I treat nukes and wind as zero carbon.  This calculator does not see all of the wind or basically any of the solar on the GB grid because they are embedded in medium or low voltage networks and not metered by National Grid (Elexon), but generally the numbers are still reasonable.

There are legitimate reasons to regard solar, wind and nukes as NOT quite zero carbon, because there are (carbon) costs in putting them together and taking them apart at end of life (and extracting, handling, and disposing of fuel for nukes) that should be amortised over the amount of energy generated over the life of the equipment.

My favourite, solar PV, has one of the higher 'low carbon' intensities by that measure, and onshore wind one of the lowest.  But still mush lower than even gas CCGT.

One can argue about balancing costs of renewables, ie other generation that has to be kept warm to cover gaps in renewable generation, but that is already done to cover failures in other fossil generators, so it is a little harder to agree on the numbers for that.  But even with those, renewables seem no in many parts of the work to be a definitely win on all-in costs as well CO2.

Rgds

Damon