Author Topic: Ethanol Plant  (Read 31880 times)

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XeonPony

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #120 on: March 06, 2013, 06:30:59 PM »
Sadly you couldn't beat the sense in them if you slapped their head through a steel bridge support! Much like religion they have don astounding mental gymnastics to convince them self they are the holder of the one true truth and every one ells are just shrills for Monsanto and BP oil, you see the idiocy in you tube all the time on the so called "free" energy devices consisting of a cow pie a crystal and some copper loops.

No amount of care full diligent explaining the reasons for why it will never work will jar a single brain cell to operation!
Ignorance is not bliss, You may not know there is a semie behind you but you'll still be a hood ornimant!

Nothing fails like prayer, Two hands clasped in work will achieve more in a minute then a billion will in a melenia in prayer. In other words go out and do some real good by helping!

ChrisOlson

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #121 on: March 06, 2013, 06:46:21 PM »
"free" energy devices consisting of a cow pie a crystal and some copper loops.

Now, I must admit, that is one that I have not seen.  But I have no doubt it can be marketed and sold profitably    :o
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niall2

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #122 on: March 06, 2013, 06:59:30 PM »
 ;)...i should,nt have mentioned the B word

maybe the F word would be more apt......seems i,m typing on top of a tiny bit of a big frack gas shale deposit

yes... the frack industry is coming and there very keen to get going at that .....

its the only show in town it seems ......all immaterial in a way as i,m going to be so rich i can leave , ....carnt i ?

 :)

XeonPony

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #123 on: March 06, 2013, 07:13:05 PM »
;)...i should,nt have mentioned the B word

maybe the F word would be more apt......seems i,m typing on top of a tiny bit of a big frack gas shale deposit

yes... the frack industry is coming and there very keen to get going at that .....

its the only show in town it seems ......all immaterial in a way as i,m going to be so rich i can leave , ....carnt i ?

 :)

Or just install a gas water separator and get free fuel for the house! and one mother of a green sand permanginate filtration system
Ignorance is not bliss, You may not know there is a semie behind you but you'll still be a hood ornimant!

Nothing fails like prayer, Two hands clasped in work will achieve more in a minute then a billion will in a melenia in prayer. In other words go out and do some real good by helping!

ChrisOlson

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #124 on: March 06, 2013, 07:26:05 PM »
I would be very careful with Earth Farts.  If a big one gets out the dinosaurs could come back:
http://www.ibtimes.com/did-giant-earth-fart-give-rise-dinosaurs-300629

If the dinosaurs come back because some gas company lets out a big Earth Fart, humans are in trouble because they'll eat everything in sight - including humans -  and there's not a hell of a lot we can do about it.
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niall2

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #125 on: March 06, 2013, 07:30:53 PM »
 :)

i,m going to need a good lawyer for that Xeon .....seemingly theres a real "sanity clause" after all....here ..yes ,you can indeed own your land , but not necessarily the deposits underneath , ......other people own them  >:(

one frack licence applicant offered to build a new community centre ( or basically something similar ) in the local central main town ....that did,nt really develop legs though .....

there going to have to offer a bit more than a new shrubbery methinks ......  :)

   

richhagen

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #126 on: March 06, 2013, 10:37:58 PM »
I found the ethanol post educational.  I would buy higher ethanol content gas for my vehicle if it were available.  My car can't take the e-85, but according to the literature I have found it would run on up to about 40% without trouble.  I tried adding a bit of e-85 to my mostly full tank to get from the 10% to about 25% and had no problems with the way the engine ran.  I would rather pay farmers and distillers here than ship more resources out of the country for fuel. 

I would imagine that most starch or sugar containing agricultural products, or even their waste could be used to produce some ethanol, but for the volume needed to have a major impact on the nations fuel supply, staple crops such as corn are needed.  It is nice that the proteins not digested by the yeast in the process can be used as animal feed, cutting down on waste and increasing the overall efficiency.

I suspect that the plant uses energy supplied by natural gas for the energy required for the separation of the ethanol produced from the water because it is likely the least expensive reliable source.  It would be nice to see wind or solar be used for that energy input, which would further enhance its renewable credentials, but that would require an inexpensive utility scale storage system which as of yet does not exist in order to approach the reliability and current pricing of natural gas.   

At any rate thanks for the tour.  Rich
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Frank S

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #127 on: March 07, 2013, 02:13:53 AM »
 Since earth farts, ownership of minerals, ancient and modern agri-production methods, strip & pit mining, aquifer contamination, the possible  killing of bees(I’m one of those who have some concerns but I can see where  those issues are being addressed or have been addressed),  Modified foods, maybe even world domination have been discussed in this thread all because one person who  actually is in the know cared enough to share  a few pictures of grain being delivered to an Ethanol production plant.
The reason he is in the know is because his livelihood depends up[on keeping up with current and future methods as well as regulatory restrictions .
 I believe that even fracking might have popped up once if not I don’t mean to call too much attention to the subject > before everyone starts jumping up an down spouting all of the BAAAD things about fracking  I want to say this Fracking is done all over the world  and I think since its inception over 2.5 million wells have been fractured  one of the first wells fractured was in Kansas,  in the Hugoton gas field in Grant County, Kansas by Stanolind Oil in 1949. One thousand gallons of napalm-thickened gasoline was injected, followed by a gel breaker, to frack limestone at 2,400 ft. My first experience with fracking was when I was a teenager working at the blacksmith, welding & machine shop we built a few frack tank trailers But I had no idea what or how they were used, until one day the owner’s son took me with him to do some welding on a drill rig we had to weld on a nipple to the Christmas tree so the pump and the frack trailer could be hooked up. Much has changed since then as new methods have been discovered.
 It was mentioned about the irresponsibility’s of big oil and how big oil is destroying the global environment. That may be true in a sense
 But everyone on this planet would be hard pressed to carry on in our daily lives without petroleum based products or fossil fuel based products.
 When crude oil first started to be used Gasoline was a by-product.
 Thanks to men like Karl Benz, Ramson E. Olds, Hennery Ford and others gasoline became a major part of an industry.
 Currently there is about 23 million odd acres now used in corn production, producing as much corn as it would have taken half a billion acres just a few decades ago.
 As more uses for ethanol are incorporated and gradually reduce the amount of crude required to produce the over 6000 products manufactured from it.
Maybe we should be thankful there are researchers like Monsanto Bayer and others because as I see it the production of food stuffs is actually only a small part or the benefits of their research.
The life a phobic folks of the planet need to look at all sides of an equation, before chaining themselves to the entrance of a research facility if they cannot come to grips with life as a whole then they have the right to just stop breathing
  Maybe we do need to try and bring back a few dinosaurs maybe they could be trained to eat only the Pollies and the city dwellers   
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Bruce S

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #128 on: March 07, 2013, 05:17:41 AM »
HI Rich!!
How's the snow over there!  ;)
Coming from some experience, and depending on the age of your vehicle. You can run it up to 45% without any mods at all.
The one thing some people have done was to install hotter spark plugs, this is the wrong direction. Stay with the standard plugs or go one plug colder. May seems backwards, but it's the flame front that needs the cooler plugs. I trained Robin's 93 Lumina APV V6 oxygen sensors to work in the summer with up to 65% Alky before the check engine light comes on.
Though it did take several fuel filters and 4 tanks of fuel to clean the junk out of the tank.
 During winter we back back down to 15%, so there's less of a cold start problem.
 There's a plug-n-play adapter that costs a few pretty pennies; that will allow it to run 100% if I wish to go that route, but with 246+K miles on it. It's almost time to say goodbye to it.
AND my 2010 Cobalt doesn't like anything higher than 50% without popping that little light.


Frank S;
Get one of those oversized chickens roaming my city life; and we'll have one heck of a roaster out on the spit ! ;). just think ! come Thanksgiving how many could actually get the leg meat that ask for it, instead of fighting for it  8)

niall2;
It's unfortunate but mostly true, when you purchase land or even a home, you need to ASK about mineral rights otherwise you don't automatically have them. That needs to be added into the purchase agreement.

I as a GM am encouraged by the fact this thread, except for a few, has actually stayed "civil" .
One of the long time posters had a sig that is well well put. "A gentleman is someone who can disagree without being disagreeable" or something like.  :).

For those wishing to learn more about the deeper science of this whole ethanol and giving back to the soil part.
Google David Blume and checkout the deeper science, real world tests  he's done.
Cheers;
Bruce S   
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ChrisOlson

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #129 on: March 07, 2013, 06:38:57 AM »
Evidently, renewable fuels like ethanol are a controversial subject.  I didn't realize how controversial it is until people started harping about GMO's and FrankenCorn and whatnot.  I would have to check the current numbers but I think the US is the largest producer of ethanol on earth and Brazil is #2.
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XeonPony

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #130 on: March 07, 2013, 06:54:44 AM »
if you go by percapita Brazil is the biggest as allot of their vehicals are 100% if I recall corectly, but again would have to look my self has been a while, or perhaps I am thinking CNG?
Ignorance is not bliss, You may not know there is a semie behind you but you'll still be a hood ornimant!

Nothing fails like prayer, Two hands clasped in work will achieve more in a minute then a billion will in a melenia in prayer. In other words go out and do some real good by helping!

ChrisOlson

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #131 on: March 07, 2013, 10:00:55 AM »
The United States became the world's largest producer of ethanol fuel in 2005.  The U.S. produced 13.9 billion U.S. liquid gallons (52.6 billion liters) of ethanol fuel in 2011, an increase from 13.2 billion U.S. liquid gallons (49.2 billion liters) in 2010, and up from 1.63 billion gallons in 2000.  Brazil and U.S. production accounted for 87.1% of global production in 2011.  In the U.S, ethanol fuel is mainly used as an oxygenate in gasoline in the form of low-level blends up to 10 percent, and to an increasing extent, as E85 fuel for flex-fuel vehicles.

The ethanol market share in the U.S. gasoline supply grew by volume from just over 1 percent in 2000 to more than 3 percent in 2006 to 10 percent in 2011.  Domestic production capacity increased fifteen times after 1990, from 900 million US gallons to 1.63 billion US gal in 2000, to 13.5 billion US gallons in 2010

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethanol_fuel_in_the_United_States

The United States became the world’s leading exporter of ethanol in 2011, selling a record level of the biofuel into overseas markets, according to the Renewable Fuels Association
http://fuelfix.com/blog/2012/01/18/u-s-became-worlds-top-ethanol-exporter-in-2011/

In other words, ethanol has become Big Business in the US.
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ChrisOlson

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #132 on: March 07, 2013, 10:16:56 AM »
  Maybe we do need to try and bring back a few dinosaurs maybe they could be trained to eat only the Pollies and the city dwellers

Dinosaurs cannot be trained.  They eat everything.  Shooting at them only pi$$es them off.  Didn't you ever watch Jurassic Park?  The dinosaur thing didn't go so good.  Dinosaurs win because they're big and they only got a brain that's the size of a grapefruit and the only thing in that brain is mean.

There's a reason dinosaurs ruled this planet for longer than man has even been on it so far.  Man might think he's got superior intelligence, but that don't hold a candle to big, mean and impervious to bullets.
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BillBlake

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #133 on: March 07, 2013, 11:49:59 AM »
The Coal To Liquid movement in the US didn't seem to get very far yet but ethanol is becoming
a 'back door man' technology doing just that. Corn is it's ho.  :o
Of coarse plenty of USA Natural Gas has been getting turned into Liquid for vehicles as well.

There are a lot of stories on the Internet about the positive economic impact of King Clean Coal
technology muscling in on this ethanol deal.

Remember that Coal and Oil Shale is what the US really Rules worldwide.

Actually we are able to take them ALL on all at the Same Time as far as Reserves go.
I loves it.

This angle is also coming on.

Power Pairings

http://www.ethanolproducer.com/articles/3089/power-pairings/

With all that said we still have a mighty long way to go.
No need to poo poo the power of microbiology and risk a nightmare of epic proportions
because we were pushy - but stupid.

If Poet can do half of ALL Ethanol without messing with antibiotics let's just make it 100%
for that extra penny or two. We will make it up as we start to put a good  stomping on them.

We need to keep pushing the real Kings as well as Ethanol.

In all the excitement it's easy to forget the hard reality.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
US trade gap widens to $44.4B as oil imports rise

MARTIN CRUTSINGER , The Associated Press
 
Posted: Thursday, March 7, 2013, 12:24 PM


WASHINGTON - The U.S. trade deficit widened in January, reflecting a big jump in oil imports and a drop in exports.
 
The Commerce Department said Thursday that the deficit rose to $44.4 billion, an increase of 16.5 percent from December. U.S. exports dropped 1.2 percent to $184.5 billion, reflecting declines in sales to Europe, China, Japan and Brazil. Imports rose 1.8 percent to $228.9 billion
as oil imports surged 12.3 percent.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<snipith>

http://www.philly.com/philly/business/20130307_ap_ustradegapwidensto444basoilimportsrise.html?c=r

Bill Blake
« Last Edit: March 07, 2013, 11:58:51 AM by BillBlake »

MaryAlana

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #134 on: March 07, 2013, 12:56:36 PM »
I remember seeing this in the news a few years ago for coal to gas, then it died when the company landed in court http://www.bixbyenergy.com/technology/what-is-the-bixby-process

ChrisOlson

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #135 on: March 07, 2013, 02:35:33 PM »
The Coal To Liquid movement in the US didn't seem to get very far yet but ethanol is becoming
a 'back door man' technology doing just that.

That's because when the RFS was signed into law in 2005 there was all sorts of wild ideas about switchgrass, liquified natural gas, so-called "clean coal", etc. etc. etc..

The mandate required 7.5 billion gallons of renewable fuel blended into gasoline by 2012.  There was only group of businessmen and women that had the technology, resources, practical knowledge and business expertise to make it happen at a price competitive with petroleum.

The RFS requirement was not only met - it was exceeded because the farmers were faster on their feet than the government and the E15 standard did not get approved before we started producing excess that we are now exporting overseas.

When somebody else demonstrates that they can actually get the job done then these other sources of renewable fuels will have something to brag about.  Until then all they got is still a bunch of wild ideas and no practical technology to back them up.
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Frank S

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #136 on: March 07, 2013, 02:51:24 PM »
[
Dinosaurs cannot be trained.  They eat everything.  Shooting at them only pi$$es them off.  Didn't you ever watch Jurassic Park?  The dinosaur thing didn't go so good.  Dinosaurs win because they're big and they only got a brain that's the size of a grapefruit and the only thing in that brain is mean.
Chris

 That's true however Jurassic park used frog DNA .
 I'm thinking the better choice would be use the DNA of folks like the organic woman . and grow them as all male then neuter them early in life they would be so confused by the time they were full grown they would wind up eating each other the size of the brain thing may be a problem would a walnut be big enough.
 I thoroughly  enjoy threads like this one they force me to update my data base. Things that I knew to be cutting edge 10/ 20 /30/ or 40 years ago. which was at the time thought to be the absolute in the ways things could be done.
 Our old alfalfa fields produced something on the order 6 to 8 tons per acre those same fields today if they weren't buried under concrete and houses might be expected to produce 12 to 16 tons 
 Corn is not the crop of choice in Texas the soils are fine in some places but the climate is not as friendly
 One of our bigger crops was Alfalfa and another was coastal Bermuda,
 There is as much difference in growing alfalfa and corn as night and day but both are susceptible to disease insects and weeds.
 We combated allot of this with my Grandpa's method of farming as previously stated.
 I think he would love the following report.
 
  Genetically modified alfalfa
Roundup Ready alfalfa, a genetically modified variety was released by Forage Genetics Int'l in 2005. This was developed through the insertion of a gene owned by Monsanto Company that confers resistance to glyphosate, a broad-spectrum herbicide, also known as Roundup. Although most grassy and broadleaf plants, including ordinary alfalfa, are killed by Roundup, growers can spray fields of Roundup Ready alfalfa with the glyphosate herbicide and kill the weeds without harming the alfalfa crop.
[edit]Legal issues with Roundup Ready alfalfa in the US
In 2005, after completing a 28-page environmental assessment (EA)[53] the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) granted Roundup Ready alfalfa (RRA) nonregulated status[54] under Code of Federal Regulations Title 7 Part 340,[55] called, "Introduction of Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to Believe Are Plant Pests," which regulates, among other things, the introduction (importation, interstate movement, or release into the environment) of organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason to believe are plant pests. Monsanto had to seek deregulation to conduct field trials of RRA, because the RRA contains a promoter sequence derived from the plant pathogen figwort mosaic virus.[53] The USDA granted the application for deregulation, stating that the RRA with its modifications: "(1) Exhibit no plant pathogenic properties; (2) are no more likely to become weedy than the nontransgenic parental line or other cultivated alfalfa; (3) are unlikely to increase the weediness potential of any other cultivated or wild species with which it can interbreed; (4) will not cause damage to raw or processed agricultural commodities; (5) will not harm threatened or endangered species or organisms that are beneficial to agriculture; and (6) should not reduce the ability to control pests and weeds in alfalfa or other crops."[53] Monsanto started selling RRA and within two years, more than 300,000 acres were devoted to the plant in the US.[56]
The granting of deregulation was opposed by many groups, including growers of non-GM alfalfa who were concerned about gene flow into their crops.[53] In 2006, the Center for Food Safety, a US non-governmental organization that is a critic of biotech crops, and others challenged this deregulation in the California Northern District Court[57] Organic growers were concerned that the GM alfalfa could cross-pollinate with their organic alfalfa, making their crops unsalable in countries that ban the growing of GM crops.[58] The District Court ruled that the USDA's EA did not address two issues concerning RRA's effect on the environment[59] and in 2007, required the USDA to complete a much more extensive environmental impact statement (EIS). Until the EIS was completed, they banned further planting of RRA but allowed land already planted to continue.[56][60] The USDA proposed a partial deregulation of RRA but this was also rejected by the District Court.[57] Planting of RRA was halted.
In June 2009, a divided three-judge panel on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld Breyer's decision.[61] Monsanto and others appealed to the US Supreme Court[61]
On 21 June 2010, in Monsanto Co. v. Geertson Seed Farms, the Supreme Court overturned the District Court decision to ban planting RRA nationwide as there was no evidence of irreparable injury.[62] They ruled that the USDA could partially deregulate RRA before an EIS was completed. The Supreme Court did not consider the District Court's ruling disallowing RRA's deregulation and consequently RRA was still a regulated crop waiting for USDA's completion of an EIS.[57]
This decision was welcomed by the American Farm Bureau Federation, Biotechnology Industry Organization, American Seed Trade Association, American Soybean Association, National Alfalfa and Forage Alliance, National Association of Wheat Growers, National Cotton Council and National Potato Council.[63] In July 2010, 75 members of Congress from both political parties sent a letter to Vilsack asking him to immediately allow limited planting of genetically engineered alfalfa.[64][65] However the USDA did not issue interim deregulatory measures, instead focusing on completing the EIS. Their 2,300 page EIS was published in December 2010.[66] It concluded that RRA would not affect the environment.
Three of the biggest natural food brands in the USA lobbied for a partial deregulation of RR alfalfa[67] but in January 2011, despite protests from organic groups, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the USDA had approved the unrestricted planting of genetically modified alfalfa and planting resumed.[68][69][70] Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack commented "After conducting a thorough and transparent examination of alfalfa ... APHIS [Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service] has determined that Roundup Ready alfalfa is as safe as traditionally bred alfalfa."[71] About 20 million acres (8 million hectares) of alfalfa were grown in the US, the fourth-biggest crop by acreage, of which about 1% were organic. Some biotechnology officials forecast that half of the US alfalfa acreage could eventually be planted with GM alfalfa.[72]
The National Corn Growers Asociation,[73] the American Farm Bureau Federation,[74] and the Council for Biotech Information[75] warmly applauded this decision. Christine Bushway, CEO of the Organic Trade Association said "A lot of people are shell shocked. While we feel Secretary Vilsack worked on this issue, which is progress, this decision puts our organic farmers at risk."[72] The Organic Trade Association issued a press release in 2011 saying that the USDA recognized the impact that cross contamination could have on organic alfalfa and urged them to place restrictions to minimise any such contamination.[76] However organic farming groups, organic food outlets, and activists responded by publishing an open letter saying that planting the "alfalfa without any restrictions flies in the face of the interests of conventional and organic farmers, preservation of the environment, and consumer choice."[77] Senator Debbie Stabenow, Chairwoman of the Senate Agriculture Committee,[78] House Agriculture Committee Chairman, Frank Lucas,[78] and Senator Richard Lugar [79] issued statements strongly supporting the decision "...giving growers the green light to begin planting an abundant, affordable and safe crop" and giving farmers and consumers the choice "...in planting or purchasing food grown with GM technology, conventionally, or organically." In a Joint Statement U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy and Representative Peter DeFazio said the USDA had the "opportunity to address the concerns of all farmers", but instead "surrender[ed] to business as usual for the biotech industry."[80]
The Center for Food Safety appealed this decision in March 2011[81][82] but the District Court for Northern California rejected this motion in 2012.[83]
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ChrisOlson

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #137 on: March 07, 2013, 03:39:01 PM »
I'm thinking the better choice would be use the DNA of folks like the organic woman [/i]

We do not need redhead organic dinosaurs that think they got genetically engineered Bt toxin in 'em.  That would be worse than the regular ones that just eat everything.

We only grow 100 acres of alfalfa for the beef cattle.  I don't like alfalfa because it has to be cut and harvested in the summer and it cuts into my fishin' time.
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Frank S

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #138 on: March 07, 2013, 04:21:47 PM »
We only grow 100 acres of alfalfa for the beef cattle.  I don't like alfalfa because it has to be cut and harvested in the summer and it cuts into my fishin' time.
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Chris

 ROFL cuts in the summer try 3 /4 or sometimes as many as 8 times
 My sister loved that show green acres because she got tired of smelling hay.
 My male cousins and I loved it because we got .02c for every bale hauled and stacked.
 by the time it got up to .05c per bale we had 3 old school buses cut down and made into flat bed haulers by our 4 season hauling for hire all around the county. each of the 9 of us had a couple $1000.00 dollars saved up ( teenagers can spend money as fast as they earn it ) 3 on a team could load 300 bales before a cat could lick his behind.
 the steering wheel of the bus tied with a rope gas pedal screwed down  2 guys on the bus catching & stacking from the John Deere side loader 1 on the ground dragging. Used the same bus with short stake sides to haul watermelons and cantaloupe
 for really large fields I drove the 8020 a rebadged 8010 John Deere, pulling up to 4 or sometimes up to 6 reworked cotton wagons I got to where I could chain up 4 wagons and successfully back them up to the barn   
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ChrisOlson

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #139 on: March 07, 2013, 05:00:08 PM »
My male cousins and I loved it because we got .02c for every bale hauled and stacked. 

Bales?  BALES?  You gotta be kidding.

We chop the worthless stuff with a German-built Claas SpeedStar forage harvester that has two 600 hp Mercedes diesels in it:


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bob golding

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #140 on: March 07, 2013, 06:58:30 PM »
My male cousins and I loved it because we got .02c for every bale hauled and stacked. 

Bales?  BALES?  You gotta be kidding.

We chop the worthless stuff with a German-built Claas SpeedStar forage harvester that has two 600 hp Mercedes diesels in it:


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Chris


bet that thing drinks the juice. the ones around here used for cutting corn for fodder use around 900 litres a day. they chop the corn, cobs, leaves, stalk in one go. ethanol over here is guarded like gold, just in case you think about drinking it without the tax man getting his cut. did think about using it for bio diesel instead of methanol,but too many hoops to jump though. think they make it from sugar beet waste though.
if i cant fix it i can fix it so it cant be fixed.

ChrisOlson

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #141 on: March 07, 2013, 07:41:42 PM »
It burns around 20 gallons an hour chopping hay.  We only run one engine in hay.  It takes both engines for chopping corn with a 10 row head.

Bearing went out in the cutterhead last summer - knives hit the cutterbar and blew the cylinder all apart, wrecked the accelerator and blew a big hole in the hood.  The one dude on the torque wrench there torquing knives, you don't want to mess with - he'll swipe you with a paw and knock you into the next state.


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« Last Edit: March 07, 2013, 08:00:57 PM by ChrisOlson »

XeonPony

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #142 on: March 07, 2013, 08:55:19 PM »
Looks like my unkle, only thing missing is a keg of beer and a red beard! He'd just carry it to the garage though instead of working out side!
Ignorance is not bliss, You may not know there is a semie behind you but you'll still be a hood ornimant!

Nothing fails like prayer, Two hands clasped in work will achieve more in a minute then a billion will in a melenia in prayer. In other words go out and do some real good by helping!

Frank S

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #143 on: March 08, 2013, 12:53:07 AM »


Bales?  BALES?  You gotta be kidding.
We chop the worthless stuff with a German-built Claas SpeedStar forage harvester that has two 600 hp Mercedes diesels in it:
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 Like I said a lot has changed since the mid to late 60s we thought we were making all the money in the world after we started getting .o4c per bale in good fields we could haul 3 to 400 bales to the stack area per hour got an additional .01 to air stack the green stuff
 the bales that were in o danger of spontaneous combustion we could just drop the right side board to use as a slid ramp wrap the load in a tarp use a spreader bar and drag the cube off with the Moline or the 8020 if it was available   
 That Jaguar is a huge improvement over the New Holland 818 back then you mowed then wind-rowed  then chopped or you ran the combine through and wind-rowed the chaff then chopped
 Mowing and baling was involved as well, but at least we had a twin bar sickle mower and could mow a 32 ft swath, then the rakes had to make the wind rows and sometimes the hay had to be turned 2 times to allow it to dry out some before baling.
 People talk about how much fuel the modern machines consume. Comparatively speaking for the amount of production yields they produce their fuel and labor costs are nothing if you take into account what was involved 40 or 50 years ago.
I live so far outside of the box, when I die they will stretch my carcass over the coffin

ChrisOlson

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #144 on: March 08, 2013, 06:59:28 AM »
The fuel cost today is less per acre than it was 40 years ago.  On $65 worth of fuel that Claas forage harvester will suck up 30 acres of high yield crop in one hour.  In the old days it took all day to bale 30 acres of freaking hay and more fuel than that just to haul the bales.

Same with planting and harvesting corn.  We burn less than 1/10 of the fuel today, as compared to 40 years ago, to grow an acre of corn - and we get 3x the yield from that acre that was gotten 40 years ago.  When my planter rolls in the spring it might take a 250 hp tractor to pull it, and the tractor burns 12 gallons of fuel an hour, but it plants an acre of corn every 2 minutes.

Of course, when something breaks it costs $40,000 to fix it too, and the whole farm didn't cost that 40 years ago.  LOL!
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Frank S

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #145 on: March 08, 2013, 08:02:58 AM »
Yea right! if your lucky it will only cost 40 grand.

I live so far outside of the box, when I die they will stretch my carcass over the coffin

Frank S

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #146 on: March 09, 2013, 12:07:47 AM »
actually I've seen how much some major repair bills can be. On construction equipment a single sun-strand hyd pump from cat  excavator can cost 30K and many have 3 of them.
Also  about 20 years ago a cousin in Oklahoma had a D343 Cat engine go down on him right in the middle of harvest season with rain in the forecast. He had 3 choices .It seems there are always 3 choices
 choice #1 find a replacement engine  and hopefully be back up and running in a couple of days if  a replacement can be found, the cost upwards of 20 grand possibly more. and maybe beat the rains saving $$$$$$$$ worth of crops.
 Choice #2 have the engine rebuilt possibly taking a week or more if all parts are on the shelf  maybe a few grand less depending on what needed replaced in the engine. prey that the rains held off. better to be swinging a sickle in harvest making things  happen than clasped in prayer hoping things will happen.more of a risk losing even more of the crops
#3 sit back and do nothing let the crops ruin or rely on others to finish their harvest early hire them or share crop with them to harvest for you.
 Options #2&3 never fit well with farmers who have been around for any length of time and plan on being around in the future .
 So option #1 was his only real choice all along.
 Except that he has a way of creating a 4th option. first call for expedited replacement hang the $$$$ amount. 2nd call everyone in his Rolodex explaining the situation and steps taken. asking if any or all who may finish their harvest a day or 2 ahead of schedule might lend a hand at what ever equitable terms.
 in the end several showed up to help his harvest because they pushed their-selves just a little harder to bring in their harvest a few hours faster some had smaller yields than figured so finished ahead An older mothballed machine that was being made ready for sale by a neighbor was loaned to him. They beat the rains and his machine was in the fields within 3 days final cost I have no idea.     
I live so far outside of the box, when I die they will stretch my carcass over the coffin

XeonPony

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #147 on: March 09, 2013, 09:52:36 AM »
people look at me wierd as I have at least a couple grand tied up in spar parts siting in my little trailer, but for some reason they don't look at me weird when I have a major failure and am up and runing in from an houre to a day at worst!

I even carry a spare starter in the truck along with a full belt kit and a break set kit!, puting on a starter in dead summer on hot cemeant after dring 700Km is not fun, but not being stranded was better!
Ignorance is not bliss, You may not know there is a semie behind you but you'll still be a hood ornimant!

Nothing fails like prayer, Two hands clasped in work will achieve more in a minute then a billion will in a melenia in prayer. In other words go out and do some real good by helping!

ChrisOlson

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #148 on: March 09, 2013, 11:18:47 AM »
So option #1 was his only real choice all along.

Nowadays you just call up the dealer and 3 hours later they pull in with a semi and unload a rental unit.
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MaryAlana

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Re: Ethanol Plant
« Reply #149 on: March 09, 2013, 12:32:27 PM »
I grew up driving junk cars, still carry spare parts even though my current car is only a 2005 with 69k miles on it.  Rather have something than be sitting roadside. I grew up working on stock cars so fixing is second nature.